Boeing Delta 4 Launch Postponed

Dec 14, 2004

Sunday's launch attempt of the Boeing Delta IV Heavy launch vehicle at Cape Canaveral, Fla., was scrubbed for the third day because of equipment problems. During securing activities following Saturday's launch attempt, the Environmental Control System experienced a system outage.

The first planned launch attempt on Friday was pushed back due to poor weather conditions. The launch team is now awaiting the first available date on the range to reschedule the launch. It is possible the Delta 4-Heavy could now lift-off on Tuesday 21 December.

The Delta IV family blends new and mature technology to launch virtually any size medium or heavy payload into space, with the largest success being the now flight proven RS-68 engine. The vehicle is capable of pushing 13 tonnes of payload towards a geostationary orbit.

Boeing spokesman Dan Beck said the Delta IV launch would still be the "first and only" demonstration of heavy-lift capability that was currently scheduled.

Explore further: Eclipsing binary stars discovered by high school students

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Spitzer telescope celebrates ten years in space

Aug 23, 2013

(Phys.org) —Ten years after a Delta II rocket launched NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, lighting up the night sky over Cape Canaveral, Fla., the fourth of the agency's four Great Observatories continues ...

NASA flies radar south on wide-ranging expedition

Apr 04, 2013

(Phys.org) —A versatile NASA airborne imaging radar system is showcasing its broad scientific prowess for studying our home planet during a month-long expedition over the Americas.

Recommended for you

Swirling electrons in the whirlpool galaxy

15 hours ago

The whirlpool galaxy Messier 51 (M51) is seen from a distance of approximately 30 million light years. This galaxy appears almost face-on and displays a beautiful system of spiral arms.

Australian amateur Terry Lovejoy discovers new comet

19 hours ago

It's confirmed! Australian amateur astronomer Terry Lovejoy just discovered his fifth comet, C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy). He found it August 17th using a Celestron C8 fitted with a CCD camera at his roll-off roof ...

A spectacular landscape of star formation

21 hours ago

This image, captured by the Wide Field Imager at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, shows two dramatic star formation regions in the Milky Way. The first, on the left, is dominated by the star cluster NGC ...

User comments : 0