Boeing Delta 4 Launch Postponed

Dec 14, 2004

Sunday's launch attempt of the Boeing Delta IV Heavy launch vehicle at Cape Canaveral, Fla., was scrubbed for the third day because of equipment problems. During securing activities following Saturday's launch attempt, the Environmental Control System experienced a system outage.

The first planned launch attempt on Friday was pushed back due to poor weather conditions. The launch team is now awaiting the first available date on the range to reschedule the launch. It is possible the Delta 4-Heavy could now lift-off on Tuesday 21 December.

The Delta IV family blends new and mature technology to launch virtually any size medium or heavy payload into space, with the largest success being the now flight proven RS-68 engine. The vehicle is capable of pushing 13 tonnes of payload towards a geostationary orbit.

Boeing spokesman Dan Beck said the Delta IV launch would still be the "first and only" demonstration of heavy-lift capability that was currently scheduled.

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