Sun Unveils Next Generation Client Technology

Dec 14, 2004

Sun Microsystems, Inc. (Nasdaq: SUNW) today unveiled its next generation Sun Ray Server Software 3.0 an interoperable, platform that enables instant, secure access to corporate applications and data from broadband-enabled home, satellite and remote offices. Sun also introduced the Sun Ray 170, a sleek new innovative desktop client.

Together, Sun Ray Server Software 3.0 and the Sun Ray 170 ultra-thin client further extend Sun Ray technology to run over DSL or broadband connections beyond traditional in-house networks. This functionality allows customers to truly bridge mobility with security utilizing either Solaris Operating System or Linux OS-based environments.

Sun Ray technology delivers a secure, easy-to-use remote work environment. By combining Java Card(tm) technology for increased levels of authentication with the absence of a local operating system that could be hacked, Sun Ray clients are virtually immune from virus attacks.

With Sun Ray technology, our customers are empowered to mobilize their workforce while maintaining control over data and intellectual property," said Fred Kohout, vice president, marketing, Client Systems Group at Sun Microsystems. "Unique to all Sun Ray clients is an integrated smart card reader. By simply using a Java Card technology-enabled smart card employees can securely access their work environment at home, remove the card, commute to work and reinsert the Java Card into a corporate system to continue exactly where they left off."

Sun Ray Server Software 3.0
Sun Ray Server Software 3.0 creates a secure, cost-effective, low-administration desktop environment for enterprise, government, and technical customers. The software runs on both the Solaris Operating System and Linux, and supports every Sun Ray client Sun has ever shipped.

Sun Ray Software 3.0 uses sophisticated bandwidth adaptation and management technology to reduce bandwidth requirements for Sun Ray clients by more than half while still delivering a full, rich desktop experience. Sun Ray clients can now be connected over the same broadband connections found in homes to access corporate applications and data to enable a new mobile, highly secure workforce. Outstanding user performance is maintained by employing the aggressive compression techniques, including Discrete Wavelet Transform compression for images and Lemple Ziv 77 for text and data.

New features include:
Support for Linux, including the Sun Java(tm) Desktop System Software, SuSE Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Enterprise Linux.
Reduced bandwidth usage to enable a remotely deployed Sun Ray client via DSL or cable modem connections.
Expanded peripheral support and administrator flexibility to control peripheral access for enhanced security.
Support for the PC/SC smart card framework that enables advanced smart card middleware applications from Sun and third party providers. These applications can enable multi-factor authentication via smart cards using PKCS#11, S/MIME digital signature message signing and encryption.

Sun Ray 170
The Sun Ray Ultra-Thin Client 170 integrates Sun Ray client functionality with a 17-inch flat panel display into a sleek and elegant design. The compact design is ideal for tight desktop spaces such as call centers. The Sun Ray 170 ultra-thin client is easy to install and requires no configuration -- just plug it into a configured network. Its projector port makes this unit excellent for meeting rooms, allowing presenters to enter a conference room with just a smart card rather than a laptop.

The Sun Ray 170 is ideal for home offices because of its innovative design, silent operation and small desktop footprint. It can also be used as an external display, and provides 56% higher resolution and 36% more viewing area than the previous model, the Sun Ray Ultra-Thin Client 150.

For more information about the Sun Ray product line, please visit www.sun.com/sunray .

Explore further: Canada's CBC websites hacked by pro-Syrian group

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Senators get no clear answers on air bag safety

2 hours ago

There were apologies and long-winded explanations, but after nearly four hours of testimony about exploding Takata air bags, senators never got a clear answer to the question most people have: whether or ...

Nicaragua: Studies say canal impact to be minimal

2 hours ago

Officials said Thursday that studies have determined a $40 billion inter-oceanic canal across Nicaragua will have minimal impact on the environment and society, and construction is to begin next month.

Former Brown dean whose group won Nobel Prize dies

2 hours ago

David Greer, a doctor who co-founded a group that won the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize for working to prevent nuclear war and who helped transform the medical school at Brown University, has died. He was 89.

Recommended for you

Shedding light on solar power

3 hours ago

Everyone wants to save energy, but not everyone knows where to start. Grid Resources, a startup based out of the Centre for Urban Energy's iCUE incubator, is developing a new website that seeks to help homeowners ...

Energy transition project moves into its second phase

4 hours ago

Siemens is studying new concepts for optimizing the cost-effectiveness and technical performance of energy systems with distributed and fluctuating electricity production. The associated IRENE research project ...

EU Parliament votes to break up Google

5 hours ago

The European Parliament voted overwhelmingly for the break-up of Google Thursday in a largely symbolic vote that nevertheless cast another blow in the four-year standoff between Brussels and the US Internet ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.