EU's Galileo satnav system over budget, late: report

Oct 07, 2010

Europe's Galileo satellite navigation system, meant to rival the US-built Global Positioning System (GPS), is over budget, running late and will be unprofitable for years, a press report said on Thursday.

Extra costs of 1.5-1.7 billion euros (2.1-2.4 billion dollars) are expected and the project will not be ready until 2017-18, Germany's Financial Times Deutschland daily cited a report as saying.

Originally the system was meant to be up and running, rivalling the dominance of the Pentagon's GPS in satnav systems in cars, for example, 10 years earlier, the FTD said.

Last year, the European Court of Auditors criticised the project as ill-prepared and badly managed, and in January the Commission said it would be in operation in 2014.

The FTD also cited the report as saying the project will be unprofitable "over the long term", running at a annual loss of 750 million euros.

The project will cost taxpayers about 20 billion euros over the next 20 years in development, construction and operating costs, the paper said.

The 27-nation European Union has struggled to secure financing for the project, originally put at 3.4 billion euros, and has had to tap unused funds from the bloc's massive agricultural budget.

Galileo is intended to offer a superior accuracy of one metre (yard), compared to up to 10 metres for GPS. The European version would have global coverage and an encrypted, pay service for commercial clients, with extra information such as weather detail.

Russia is also developing a rival system known as Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS), while China is working on the Beidou Navigation System.

Explore further: Tracking a gigantic sunspot across the Sun

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Europe Wants To Speed Up Galileo GPS Program

Nov 18, 2005

Former European commissioner Karel Van Miert has been appointed mediator to accelerate Galileo, Europe 's satellite navigation program, said the European Commission on Tuesday.

Recommended for you

China completes first mission to moon and back

56 minutes ago

China completed its first return mission to the moon early Saturday with the successful re-entry and landing of an unmanned probe, state media reported, in the latest step forward for Beijing's ambitious ...

Tracking a gigantic sunspot across the Sun

1 hour ago

An active region on the sun – an area of intense and complex magnetic fields – rotated into view on Oct. 18, 2014. Labeled AR 12192, it soon grew into the largest such region in 24 years, and fired off ...

Cassini sees sunny seas on Titan

Oct 30, 2014

(Phys.org) —As it soared past Saturn's large moon Titan recently, NASA's Cassini spacecraft caught a glimpse of bright sunlight reflecting off hydrocarbon seas.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.