Black mothers cite lack of desire as top reasons for not breastfeeding

Oct 04, 2010

While more American mothers are breastfeeding today, non-Hispanic Black/African American women are less likely to initiate and continue breastfeeding, primarily due to a lack of desire and lack of self-efficacy, according to research presented Monday, Oct. 4, at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in San Francisco.

Fifty-four percent of black women initiate , compared to the 73 percent national average. In the study, "Barriers to Breastfeeding Reported by Exclusively Formula Feeding Mothers," urban mothers who were exclusively formula feeding were interviewed about their breastfeeding perceptions and decision not to breastfeed.

More blacks than non-blacks reported "lacking a desire to breastfeed" (55 percent versus 27 percent). Black were less likely to report other obstacles that are more easy to overcome, such as misinformation about breastfeeding and whether a contraindication truly exists.

"Better training of health care professionals, so they can convey accurate information about breastfeeding, will likely result in improved rates of breastfeeding, but the effects may be seen more in non-blacks than blacks," said study author Amudha Palaniappan, MD. "Further research is needed to explore what contributes to lack of desire among blacks so we can develop new strategies to overcome the disparities in breastfeeding and related health outcomes."

Explore further: Tax forms could pose challenge for HealthCare.gov

Provided by American Academy of Pediatrics

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study to explore why women stop breastfeeding

Dec 06, 2007

Eighty to 90 per cent of new mothers start breastfeeding when their baby is first born because they are aware of the enormous benefits of breastmilk, however 25 per cent of new mothers will have stopped breastfeeding by the ...

Can breastfeeding reduce multiple sclerosis relapses?

Feb 19, 2009

Women who have multiple sclerosis may reduce their risk of relapses after pregnancy if they breastfeed their babies, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 61st Annual ...

Recommended for you

Can YouTube save your life?

Aug 29, 2014

Only a handful of CPR and basic life support (BLS) videos available on YouTube provide instructions which are consistent with recent health guidelines, according to a new study published in Emergency Medicine Australasia, the jo ...

Doctors frequently experience ethical dilemmas

Aug 29, 2014

(HealthDay)—For physicians trying to balance various financial and time pressures, ethical dilemmas are common, according to an article published Aug. 7 in Medical Economics.

AMGA: Physician turnover still high in 2013

Aug 29, 2014

(HealthDay)—For the second year running, physician turnover remains at the highest rate since 2005, according to a report published by the American Medical Group Association (AMGA).

Obese or overweight teens more likely to become smokers

Aug 29, 2014

A study examining whether overweight or obese teens are at higher risk for substance abuse finds both good and bad news: weight status has no correlation with alcohol or marijuana use but is linked to regular ...

User comments : 0