TRUST study data confirms safety and efficacy of erlotinib for advanced lung cancer

Oct 01, 2010

Featured in the October edition of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology (JTO), data from The Tarceva Lung Cancer Survival Treatment (TRUST) confirms the safety and efficacy profile of erlotinib, a highly potent oral active, reversible inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine-kinase (TK) activity in a large heterogeneous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) population.

Erlotinib has been shown to significantly increase survival for patients with previously treated advanced NSCLC. Certain groups of patients with NSCLC, such as those with a particular type of cancer - adenocarcinoma , women, Asian ethnicity and non (minimal) smokers are reported to be more likely to have tumor responses to EGFR TK inhibitors (TKIs) than other groups. However, results from the TRUST study suggest that can benefit a wide range of patients, including those who have previously been thought unlikely to benefit from this treatment.

The large, global, open-labeled, phase IV trial TRUST study included the participation of 513 centers across 51 countries, culminating safety data from more than 6,500 patients. In patients with advanced NSCLC, the progression-free survival and overall survival in this study were 3.25 months and 7.9 months, respectively, and the disease control rate (defined as the sum complete response, partial response, or stable disease) was 69 percent.

As a post marketing surveillance trial (phase IV) occurring after erlotinib received permission to be sold, the study provided an opportunity to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this medication in a broad patient population in a real-life clinical setting. Furthermore, it included patients with advanced stage IIIB/IV NSCLC who had previously failed on or were considered unsuitable to receive standard chemotherapy or and were ineligible for other erlotinib trials.

"The criteria used for selecting the most appropriate therapy for a patient are of particular interest to physicians," explains lead investigator Martin Reck, MD, PhD. "Tumors with EGFR mutations have been shown to be highly responsive to EGFR TKIs. Although patients whose tumors have these mutations are likely to obtain a greater magnitude of benefit from EGFR TKIs such as erlotinib, it is important to note that the absence of these mutations does not necessarily result in a lack of benefit with erlotinib therapy."

Explore further: 20 years of data shows treatment technique improvement for advanced abdominal cancer

More information: journals.lww.com/jto

Provided by International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Unraveling the 'black ribbon' around lung cancer

1 hour ago

It's not uncommon these days to find a colored ribbon representing a disease. A pink ribbon is well known to signify breast cancer. But what color ribbon does one think of with lung cancer?

Survival hope for melanoma patients thanks to new vaccine

7 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—University of Adelaide researchers have discovered that a new trial vaccine offers the most promising treatment to date for melanoma that has spread, with increased patient survival rates and improved ability ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Classifying cognitive styles across disciplines

Educators have tried to boost learning by focusing on differences in learning styles. Management consultants tout the impact that different decision-making styles have on productivity. Various fields have ...

Internet use may cut retirees' depression

Spending time online has the potential to ward off depression among retirees, particularly among those who live alone, according to research published online in The Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences an ...

Tiny power plants hold promise for nuclear energy

Small underground nuclear power plants that could be cheaper to build than their behemoth counterparts may herald the future for an energy industry under intense scrutiny since the Fukushima disaster, the ...