NASA eyes Typhoon Fanapi approaching Taiwan

Sep 17, 2010
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Fanapi on Sept. 17 at 04:45 UTC (12:45 a.m. EDT) and captured this infrared image of its cold cloudtop temperatures. The coldest cloud tops were as cold as -60F, and the imagery showed a tight center circulation. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

Infrared satellite data from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed strong convection and a tight circulation center within Typhoon Fanapi as it heads for a landfall in Taiwan this weekend.

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EDT) on Sept. 17, Fanapi's were near 85 knots (97 mph). It was centered about 360 nautical miles east-southeast of Taipei, Taiwan near 23.2 North and 127.4 East. It is churning up high seas up to 22 feet.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Fanapi on September 17 at 04:45 UTC (12:45 a.m. EDT) and captured an infrared image of its cold cloudtop temperatures. The coldest cloud tops were as cold as -60F, and the imagery showed a tight center circulation at that time.

Infrared imagery today continues to show Fanapi consolidating. The typhoon is on the border of becoming a Category 2 typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane/typhoon scale. also showed that Fanapi has an 11 mile-wide eye, and that there's a small gap in the eyewall in the northern part of the circulation. Because vertical wind shear is expected to increase over the next 12 to 24 hours, Fanapi is expected to weaken at that time.

Another instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Typhoon Fanapi. To see the image that the (MODIS) instrument captured of Typhoon Fanapi on September 17 at 04:45 UTC, go to: http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/gallery/?2010260-0917/Fanapi.A2010260.0445.

Fanapi is now moving northwest at 6 mph and is expected to make landfall on Sept. 19 during the morning hours local Asia/Taipei time (late Sept. 18 EDT). Fanapi is forecast to cross Taiwan from east to west and then emerge into the Taiwan Strait as a tropical storm and make a final landfall in eastern China on Sept. 20.

Explore further: Study shows air temperature influenced African glacial movements

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Clean air: Fewer sources for self-cleaning

4 hours ago

Up to now, HONO, also known as nitrous acid, was considered one of the most important sources of hydroxyl radicals (OH), which are regarded as the detergent of the atmosphere, allowing the air to clean itself. ...

There's something ancient in the icebox

4 hours ago

Glaciers are commonly thought to work like a belt sander. As they move over the land they scrape off everything—vegetation, soil, and even the top layer of bedrock. So scientists were greatly surprised ...

Image: Grand Canyon geology lessons on view

10 hours ago

The Grand Canyon in northern Arizona is a favorite for astronauts shooting photos from the International Space Station, as well as one of the best-known tourist attractions in the world. The steep walls of ...

First radar vision for Copernicus

11 hours ago

Launched on 3 April, ESA's Sentinel-1A satellite has already delivered its first radar images of Earth. They offer a tantalising glimpse of the kind of operational imagery that this new mission will provide ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

There's something ancient in the icebox

Glaciers are commonly thought to work like a belt sander. As they move over the land they scrape off everything—vegetation, soil, and even the top layer of bedrock. So scientists were greatly surprised ...

Clean air: Fewer sources for self-cleaning

Up to now, HONO, also known as nitrous acid, was considered one of the most important sources of hydroxyl radicals (OH), which are regarded as the detergent of the atmosphere, allowing the air to clean itself. ...

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced

Within each strand of DNA lies the blueprint for building an organism, along with the keys to its evolution and survival. These genetic instructions can give valuable insight into why pathogens like Cryptococcus ne ...

Researchers discover target for treating dengue fever

Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever, West Nile virus, Yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other ...