Research shows gender difference in energy compensation effect

Aug 25, 2010

The results of a new scientific study from Oxford Brookes University show that the consumption of caloric beverages has different affects on short-term total energy intake in men and women.

The study, conducted by Viren Ranawana and Professor Jeya Henry of the Functional Food Centre at Oxford Brookes University, is the first of its kind to compare the compensation effect of liquid calories on short-term , by gender.

During the research, male and female subjects consumed from concentrate, semi-skimmed milk, a sugar-sweetened fruit drink, or a calorie-free fruit drink, one hour before their lunchtime meal. Each group was then provided with a self-selection buffet, including a variety of foods in ample quantity, and the amount of energy they then freely consumed was analysed and compared.

The results show that liquid calories are detected by the body and compensated for at the next meal. Both men and women who consumed a drink containing calories in the morning ate less energy for lunch, compared to when they had a calorie-free mid-morning drink. However, while the mean total energy intakes for men following all four beverages were similar, women demonstrated a trend for greater following the three caloric drinks compared to the control. Thus, using a preload paradigm differing in protocol to previously reported studies, the new research gives evidence of a possible energy compensation in women compared to men.

Professor Henry, of Oxford Brookes University, said: "It is important to understand if the growth in caloric is contributing to the increased prevalence of obesity and diabetes. It has been suggested that sugars provided in liquid form encourage 'passive over-consumption' of energy from food, but this study shows that the body does compensate in the short term. Further research is now needed to understand the mechanisms involved and whether the body also compensates for liquid calorie consumption in the long term."

Explore further: Team finds key to tuberculosis resistance

More information: Ranawana, D. V., & Henry, C. J. K. (2010) Are caloric beverages compensated for in the short-term by young adults? An investigation with particular focus on gender differences. Appetite, 55, 137-46.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Sugary drinks, not fruit juice, may be linked to insulin

Sep 05, 2007

Steady increases in consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages over the last several decades, as well as rates of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, led nutritional epidemiologists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center ...

Children's consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages

Jun 02, 2008

A recent study published in Pediatrics and led by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health found that sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are an increasingly large part of children and teens' diets. ...

Researcher finds reason for weight gain

Apr 22, 2009

Liwei Chen, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Public Health, is the lead author of a research paper showing that weight gain and obesity are more linked to ...

Sweetened beverage consumption increases in the US

Dec 11, 2008

Over the past two decades, the number of adults consuming sugar-sweetened beverages such as soft drinks, fruit drinks and punches has increased dramatically, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg ...

Recommended for you

Team finds key to tuberculosis resistance

49 minutes ago

The cascade of events leading to bacterial infection and the immune response is mostly understood. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the immune response to the bacteria that causes tuberculosis ...

Mutation may cause early loss of sperm supply

1 hour ago

Brown University biologists have determined how the loss of a gene in male mice results in the premature exhaustion of their fertility. Their fundamental new insights into the complex process of sperm generation ...

No more bleeding for 'iron overload' patients?

3 hours ago

Hemochromatosis (HH) is the most common genetic disorder in the western world, and yet is barely known. Only in the US 1 in 9 people carry the mutation (although not necessarily the disease).

3-D printing offers innovative method to deliver medication

8 hours ago

3-D printing could become a powerful tool in customizing interventional radiology treatments to individual patient needs, with clinicians having the ability to construct devices to a specific size and shape. That's according ...

Mystery of the reverse-wired eyeball solved

Feb 27, 2015

From a practical standpoint, the wiring of the human eye - a product of our evolutionary baggage - doesn't make a lot of sense. In vertebrates, photoreceptors are located behind the neurons in the back of the eye - resulting ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.