Sony unveils 'Single Wire Interface Technology'

Aug 20, 2010 by John Messina weblog
Sony aims to improve design flexibility, reliability and durability for mobile devices with movable mechanisms. Credit: Sony Corp.

(PhysOrg.com) -- With Sony's newly-developed 'single wire interface technology' bi-directional transmission of multiple signals, including video, audio and control signals can propagate over a single copper cable. DC power is also sent along the same cable by using Sony's unique encoding technology with DC balance.

Mobile devices are growing at an alarming rate and becoming more sophisticated in advance functionality. This has resulted in the use of additional wiring connections that's required to transmit larger volumes of data within devices.

has teamed up with ROHM Co., Ltd a company that implements peripheral technologies. Sony will grant ROHM Co. a license for the IP of the digital portion of this newly-developed technology in order to advance the development of a single which includes both the analog and digital portions.

Sony's R&D Highlights

With Sony's unique time division duplex and multiplex system, data packets which include video, audio, and control signals can be transmitted over a single cable. Sony has also enabled bi-directional transmission of different signals by incorporating a method that retains individual synchronization.

Higher transmission speeds, up to 940 Mbps, can be achieved by using a unique multi-level encoding. Sony's newly developed hardware combines a digital portion that performs multi-level encoding; an analog portion that sends and receives signals, and a third portion that combines signals with dc power or separates them from dc power. This is illustrated in the diagram below.

Transceiver chip will provide multi-level encoding and transmission speeds up to 940 Mbps. Credit: Sony Corp.

In order to commercialize this new technology as soon as possible, Sony prototyped a chip for the analog part with the joint effort of Rohm Co Ltd; the digital part was exclusively developed by Sony. Rohm intends to combine the analog part and the digital part (license by Sony) into a chip and sell it as a transceiver chip.

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More information: Sony R&D

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User comments : 16

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lewando
3.2 / 5 (9) Aug 20, 2010
I guess "single wire" sounds better than "single cable". I count 3 wires.
DaveG
5 / 5 (2) Aug 20, 2010
So this is different than my home telephone how? Last I checked it was one wire and a ground too. Alexander Graham Bell would seem to have prior art on this.
Kedas
5 / 5 (2) Aug 20, 2010
I thought that 'no wire' was starting to be the norm now.
Skultch
5 / 5 (4) Aug 20, 2010
I thought that 'no wire' was starting to be the norm now.


Yeah, like we don't already have enough RF coursing through our brains and balls. We should use radio to communicate with something an inch away and has no reason to be separate. /snark
NameIsNotNick
5 / 5 (4) Aug 20, 2010
I guess "single wire" sounds better than "single cable". I count 3 wires.


That's what caught my attention... DC power on a single wire... that would be a neat trick! Route the DC return via a parallel universe?
trekgeek1
not rated yet Aug 20, 2010
I thought that 'no wire' was starting to be the norm now.


Yeah, like we don't already have enough RF coursing through our brains and balls. We should use radio to communicate with something an inch away and has no reason to be separate. /snark


Maybe some of us like having toasty balls in the winter. And I doubt the very low power needed would do much to your genitals, unless you are using it in advanced yoga class.
Skultch
not rated yet Aug 20, 2010
I thought that 'no wire' was starting to be the norm now.


Yeah, like we don't already have enough RF coursing through our brains and balls. We should use radio to communicate with something an inch away and has no reason to be separate. /snark


Maybe some of us like having toasty balls in the winter. And I doubt the very low power needed would do much to your genitals, unless you are using it in advanced yoga class.


haha. I don't know about you, but when I pocket dial someone, it's because my testes are getting flirtatious. :)

I wish Dell used this before my laptop caught on fire at the lid hinge.
stealthc
1 / 5 (7) Aug 20, 2010
it is only one wire. The cylinder in the middle represents the wire. The power is unidirectional but the data is bi-directional. The diagram depicts both sender and receiver, or rather two transceivers.

P.S. Lid hinge? And was the laptop battery intact or no? when laptops catch fire it is because the lithium in the battery was exposed to air -- or because it was lit on fire. As a tech I'd definitely rule out the power and interface wires as the source without a probability of doubt, unless somehow you hooked them up to a neon sign transformer by accident. your power supply can't even power 1 slot in a four slot toaster.
ormondotvos
not rated yet Aug 20, 2010
Apparently your tech education skipped over the difference between watts and watt-hours. Ever hear of a short? All you need is enough heat to start a fire in a piece of plastic. He didn't say his laptop exploded, although they've done that too.
Neurons_At_Work
not rated yet Aug 20, 2010
it is only one wire. The cylinder in the middle represents the wire. The power is unidirectional but the data is bi-directional. The diagram depicts both sender and receiver, or rather two transceivers.

P.S. Lid hinge? And was the laptop battery intact or no? when laptops catch fire it is because the lithium in the battery was exposed to air -- or because it was lit on fire. As a tech I'd definitely rule out the power and interface wires as the source without a probability of doubt, unless somehow you hooked them up to a neon sign transformer by accident. your power supply can't even power 1 slot in a four slot toaster.

Ummm, no, and...no. The 'wire' shown is a shielded cable with two insulated conductors within. (Hence, three wires.)
Second, have you forgotten Sony's, and most recently HP's, recalls? The videos of laptops bursting into flame? A battery pack contains a great deal of stored energy, and if shorted... Ask anyone who's dropped a wrench across a car battery.
Bob_Kob
not rated yet Aug 20, 2010
Well it HAS to be at least 2 wires. I don't think its possible to transmit both the positive and negative voltages over the same wire.
Nik_2213
not rated yet Aug 21, 2010
Uh, IMHO, one (1) wire would do it if you used AC above approx. audio frequencies, relying on the case capacitance-to-ground of the two units as the return. Sadly, it would transmit too little power and emit too much interference...
stealthc
1 / 5 (3) Aug 21, 2010
lol I dunno where these three wires come from. The ground isn't necessarily a wire, it could be a metal jacket in a cable. One can play semantics all they like but does it really even matter where the ground comes from just as long as there is a ground--->hence capability to drive power and bi-directional signal down a single wire.

The assumption you guys a making is that it matters where the ground connection comes from (and the diagam slightly misrepresents that concept); put simply you could have a distinct ground at both locations and it would work just the same.
Skultch
not rated yet Aug 23, 2010
P.S. Lid hinge? And was the laptop battery intact or no? when laptops catch fire it is because the lithium in the battery was exposed to air -- or because it was lit on fire. As a tech...


Haha. The fact that I am a network tech is what contributed to the fire. I used to open and close my lid about 50 times a day. As someone else stated, yes, the screen power wires just shorted out. It was a very small fire, just a spot of light and plastic smoke. It was enough to get a completely new laptop, though. :)
ClickHere
not rated yet Aug 23, 2010
"time division duplex and multiplex system" - sounds a whole lot like ADSL. Funny how analogue digital 'modems' just don't seem to want to go away.
Ravenrant
not rated yet Aug 29, 2010
The diagram is perfectly clear. It is showing a 3-wire, shielded pair, balanced signal system. The wires are plus, minus and shield (ground and it is considered a wire, if it wasn't it would be awful hard to connect to anything). The circuit shows a differential amp at both ends. This is standard noise canceling and has been around for many years. Professional audio uses balanced wiring (it needs 5 wires for 2-channel stereo). I don't see anything in that article resembling 1-wire.

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