Combined data for estimating insecticide-treated bed net coverage in Africa

Aug 17, 2010

In research published this week in PLoS Medicine Stephen Lim and colleagues (University of Washington) systematically estimate the changes in distribution of insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs) across Africa between 2000 and 2008, and find that several countries have managed to scale up their ITN coverage from near zero to more than 60%.

Development assistance for health (DAH) targeted at malaria has increased massively over the past decade, with substantial funds directed towards increasing ITN coverage. In this study the authors combined data from three sources — manufacturers' records of ITN supply, National Malaria Control Program reports on ITN distribution, and household surveys of ITN use — to estimate ITN ownership coverage and ITN use in children under 5 for 44 . They also analyzed the effects of DAH for each country on ITN coverage.

The authors found that although several countries have managed to scale up their ITN coverage, some countries, e.g. Nigeria, continue to have low ITN coverage. as a whole will therefore fall far short of the target of 80% ITN coverage by the end of 2010. The authors finding that increased DAH was related to improved ITN coverage suggests that inadequate funding might have contributed to a lack of progress in some countries. Continued financial assistance will be required to maintain and improve ITN coverage in Africa.

Explore further: Study: Extra income boosts health of elderly in poor countries

More information: Flaxman AD, Fullman N, Otten MW Jr., Menon M, Cibulskis RE, et al. (2010) Rapid Scaling Up of Insecticide-Treated Bed Net Coverage in Africa and Its Relationship with Development Assistance for Health: A Systematic Synthesis of Supply, Distribution, and Household Survey Data. PLoS Med 7(8): e1000328.doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1000328

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Alcohol apps aimed at young

5 hours ago

Apps with names like 'Let's get Wasted!' and 'Drink Thin' have led a James Cook University Professor to call for Government action on alcohol advertising on mobile devices.

Proponent of the G spot takes on a critic

5 hours ago

Ashley Furin had a "very satisfying" sex life with her husband, she said. Then, seven years into their relationship, she had "an experience that rocked me to my core." They had found her G spot.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.