France eyes tests for NDM-1 superbug

Aug 17, 2010

France will start screening patients for the NDM-1 bacterium, an antibiotic-resistant superbug that has unleashed a health scare, a medical watchdog said on Tuesday.

Patients who have been treated in a foreign hospital and are being transferred to a French hospital for further treatment will be tested for the germ, he said.

"The French medical authorities will shortly announce that all patients who have been hospitalised abroad, regardless of the country, and repatriated to a French hospital, will be screened for NDM-1 bacteria," said Patrice Nordmann, a professor at the National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) who specialises in .

"Recommendations will be made in the near future that will outline these measures," he told AFP by phone.

Nordmann, an advisor to the French health ministry, said his team had already developed a test for the NDM-1 germ.

He added that had a long-established practice of testing intensive-care patients for antibiotic-resistant strains. Patients with the bacteria are then isolated to prevent infection to others.

The superbug comprises a bacterium containing an enzyme gene called New Delhi metallo-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) that makes it impervious to treatment by almost all antibiotics.

These include drugs known as carbapenems, which are often used as a last resort.

The alarm was sounded last week by a British journal, The .

Researchers said they had identified dozens of cases among Britons who had travelled to South Asia for medical tourism.

Health tourists risked infection and the superbug could spread, they warned.

India's medical establishment reacted furiously to the study, accusing it of seeking to tar a fast-growing business.

Rich-world patients are flocking to India for operations ranging from facelifts to fertility treatments and open-heart surgery that cost in some cases only half that of western Europe.

On Friday, Brussels officials said a Belgian man became the first known fatality from NDM-1. The unnamed man had been hospitalised in Pakistan for a leg injury caused by a car accident, and died after being repatriated to a hospital in Belgium.

Explore further: S. African disease lab on frontline of Ebola fight

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

MRSA in hospital intensive care -- what's growing where?

Mar 31, 2008

Researchers are finding out which bugs grow in intensive care units to develop a novel sampling regime that would indicate the threat of MRSA and other superbugs in the environment, scientists heard today at the Society for ...

C. difficile and antibiotics not necessarily linked

Oct 07, 2008

The latest study by Dr. Sandra Dial from the Research Institute of the MUHC, McGill University, and Attending Staff in the Intensive Care Unit at the Jewish General Hospital, questions the assumption held by a vast majority ...

What makes C-Diff superbug deadly?

Mar 01, 2009

A major breakthrough about the potentially deadly superbug Clostridium difficile (C-diff) could lead to new ways to combat the bacterium, according to a study to be published March 1 in the journal Nature.

Recommended for you

Ebola aid dogged by coordination lags in Guinea

21 hours ago

Eight months into West Africa's Ebola outbreak, aid efforts in Guinea still suffer from poor coordination, hampering deployments of international support to help quell a virus that has killed more than 1,200 ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.