Mount Sinai pioneers new cardiac imaging device

Aug 16, 2010

Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine have for the first time developed a way to visualize coronary artery plaques vulnerable to rupture using multi-color computed tomography (CT), an innovation that will lead to better and earlier diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. The data are published in the September issue of Radiology.

Ruptures of are the cause of nearly 70 percent of heart attacks. High density lipoproteins (HDL), the "good" cholesterol, are drawn to plaques vulnerable to rupture and remove them from the arterial wall. The Mount Sinai team harnessed HDL by encapsulating tiny gold particles within it and injected them into mice. By using a sophisticated multi-color CT scanner, the researchers were able to see the gold particles as the HDL was targeting macrophages, or the cells that cause inflammation in the arterial wall, therefore illuminating the location of the vulnerable plaques.

"The use of multi-color CT and gold nanoparticles to visualize plaque will revolutionize ," said the research team leader, Zahi A. Fayad, PhD, Professor of Radiology and Medicine and the Director of the Translational and Institute at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. "The acquisition of this technology and development of this method will help us improve cardiovascular disease diagnosis in our patients, furthering our commitment to translational research. We look forward to continuing our study of this technology in the clinical setting."

Conventional CT detectors provide a gray image of the artery being studied, and do not provide contrast to differentiate types and density of tissue. In addition to showing the impact of the gold particles, spectral CT can simultaneously distinguish calcium deposits and contrast agents used such as iodine, which is often used to identify stenoses, or the narrowing of arteries, informing the severity of atherosclerosis and . Mount Sinai is the first institution in the world to use this scanner, made by Phillips Medical Systems, in a pre-clinical setting.

"There is a significant unmet need for imaging technology that visualizes plaque vulnerable to rupture," said the lead author of the work, David Cormode, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine. "The fact that the multi-color CT technique shows the , iodine and calcifications, provides us with a more complete picture of the nature of the atherosclerotic arteries."

Multi-color CT technology may also be beneficial in imaging other biological process and diseases, including cancer, kidney disease, and bowel diseases. The Mount Sinai team plans to continue studying the new scanner in additional animal studies and in humans.

"Mount Sinai has a decades-long history of making advances in cardiac imaging that have had a significant impact on the field and in patient care," said Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart, the Zena and Michael A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute and the Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Center for Cardiovascular Health, The Mount Sinai Medical Center. "As the first center in the world to pioneer this imaging method, we are leading the charge once more in improving diagnostic tools that lessen the potentially devastating impact of heart disease."

Explore further: US scientists make embryonic stem cells from adult skin

Provided by The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Medical journal to be re-launched

Sep 20, 2006

U.S. publisher John Wiley & Sons Inc. has signed an agreement with the Mount Sinai School of Medicine to publish the Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine.

Imaging fat layer around heart can help predict disease

Mar 15, 2010

Imaging epicardial adipose tissue, or the layer of fat around the heart, can provide extra information compared with standard diagnostic techniques such as coronary artery calcium scoring, according to research by cardiologists ...

Recommended for you

Leeches help save woman's ear after pit bull mauling

Apr 18, 2014

(HealthDay)—A pit bull attack in July 2013 left a 19-year-old woman with her left ear ripped from her head, leaving an open wound. After preserving the ear, the surgical team started with a reconnection ...

New pain relief targets discovered

Apr 17, 2014

Scientists have identified new pain relief targets that could be used to provide relief from chemotherapy-induced pain. BBSRC-funded researchers at King's College London made the discovery when researching ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.