Greenpeace to launch expedition to probe BP oil spill impact

Aug 11, 2010
Pools of dispersed oil collect on a section of the public beach on August 10 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. Environmental watchdog Greenpeace on Wednesday announced the launch of a three-month expedition on which researchers will analyze the impact of the massive BP oil spill on the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem.

Environmental watchdog Greenpeace on Wednesday announced the launch of a three-month expedition on which researchers will analyze the impact of the massive BP oil spill on the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem.

A ship sets sail Thursday from Saint Petersburg, Florida, and will tour the southern tip of Florida and its Keys before heading northward to the area of the failed oil well.

"From the very start, the full scope of the Gulf oil disaster has been obscured by BP and even our own government," said John Hocevar, Greenpeace USA Oceans Campaign Director.

"The largest accidental oil spill in history and the unprecedented use of chemical dispersants will impact Gulf marine life for years to come, and independent research is critical to ensure that BP is not allowed to hide what they have done or walk away from their responsibilities," he argued.

The ship MY Arctic Sunrise will "host independent scientists who will be researching the impacts of oil and chemical dispersants on Gulf ecosystems and marine life," Hocevar said.

Scientists will look at the ecosystem as a whole from plankton on the surface to and other life as well as the gulf floor.

BP is setting up a 20 billion-dollar fund to compensate those hurt by the disaster, in which 4.1 million barrels of oil spewed into the before BP last week fully capped the ruptured underground well.

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omatumr
3 / 5 (4) Aug 11, 2010
As an environmentalist, I supported Greenpeace before the Climategate scandal exposed deceit and manipulation of experimental observations at the heart of the environmental movement.

I no longer trust Greenpeace or the "host independent scientists who will be researching the impacts of oil and chemical dispersants on Gulf ecosystems and marine life".

With deep regret,
Oliver K. Manuel

MarkyMark
2.3 / 5 (3) Aug 12, 2010
Really? what deceit was there all i heard was some E-mails where scientists said they were using Mathmatical 'Tricks', which is hardly deceit.
omatumr
3 / 5 (2) Aug 12, 2010
I speak only for myself, Marky. I am not interested in convincing you or anybody else of my distrust of the environmental movement.

I have no confidence in scientists who hid the decline in global temperatures by using "Mathmatical Tricks".

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Former NASA Principal
Investigator for Apollo