Retail prices of healthy foods rising: study

Aug 03, 2010 by Mary Guiden

(PhysOrg.com) -- As the federal government prepares to issue its latest guidelines for healthy eating, UW researchers have found retail prices of the most nutritious foods are increasing at a higher rate than other foods.

"The rising disparity in the price of : 2004 -- 2008" was published online in Policy last month.

While all food prices have risen substantially between 2004 and 2008, the price of the most nutrient-dense foods has risen the fastest, said Pablo Monsivais, research scientist at the University of Washington's Center for Nutrition (CPHN) and lead investigator of the study. Nutrient-dense foods are those that deliver more nutrients per calorie, including , lean meats, low fat dairy products, vegetables and fruit. These foods are singled out for "increased intake" in draft versions of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines.

"We found a nearly 30 percent increase in the retail price of nutrient-dense foods in four years," said Monsivais. This compares with a 16 percent increase for less-healthy foods including sweets, candy, soft drinks and fatty foods. "The findings have serious implications for national and related policy discussions taking place in communities across the country."

Researchers looked at retail price data for 378 foods and beverages from major supermarket chains in Seattle, Wash. over the four-year timeframe. Selected foods are part of a database of a food frequency questionnaire developed by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and used previously in large-scale studies on diet and health. Supermarkets included in the study include Albertson's, Quality Food Centers (a subsidiary of Kroger) and Safeway.

"These new findings show that food cost may pose a barrier to people adopting healthier diets," said Monsivais, who added that findings are in line with previous CPHN studies. "This may limit the impact of national dietary guidelines." Adam Drewnowski, study director and co-author on the paper, agrees. "Dietary guidelines for all Americans ought to take food prices into account," he said.

The Center for Public Health Nutrition held a "Shopping for Health" conference in May 2010, bringing together public health agencies, supermarket representatives and policymakers from Washington state to discuss healthy foods, cost and new ways to identify healthy, affordable and sustainable foods. For more information on the center's research, visit the web site.

Explore further: Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Healthy Foods more Expensive than Junk Foods

Oct 17, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- Healthy foods are rising in price faster than their less healthy alternatives. This is the finding of research published in the October issue of Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health.

Recommended for you

Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for

18 hours ago

A statistical analysis of the gift "fulfillments" at several hundred online wedding gift registries suggests that wedding guests are caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to buying an appropriate gift for the ...

Can new understanding avert tragedy?

21 hours ago

As a boy growing up in Syracuse, NY, Sol Hsiang ran an experiment for a school project testing whether plants grow better sprinkled with water vs orange juice. Today, 20 years later, he applies complex statistical ...

Creative activities outside work can improve job performance

Apr 16, 2014

Employees who pursue creative activities outside of work may find that these activities boost their performance on the job, according to a new study by San Francisco State University organizational psychologist Kevin Eschleman ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

irjsiq
not rated yet Aug 04, 2010
Food Stamps . . .
Remove 'empty Calorie consumptives' and most 'processed foods' from
items which may be purchased using Food Stamps!
ADM (High Fructose Corn Syrup) will not be pleased, though healthier dining could result.
'HFCS'. . . I read labels, and I am quite astonished, more by the few 'prepared foods' which Do Not contain 'HFCS', than the multitudinous items which list 'HFCS' in their ingredients, often as the second or third ingredient!
'Canned Tomato Products' do not need sweeteners!
Very few 'Fruit Jellies/Preserves are made with Sugar, most are 'HFCS' sweetened!
Read Labels! don't take my word for it.

Roy Stewart,
Phoenix AZ

More news stories

Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for

A statistical analysis of the gift "fulfillments" at several hundred online wedding gift registries suggests that wedding guests are caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to buying an appropriate gift for the ...

Can new understanding avert tragedy?

As a boy growing up in Syracuse, NY, Sol Hsiang ran an experiment for a school project testing whether plants grow better sprinkled with water vs orange juice. Today, 20 years later, he applies complex statistical ...

Roman dig 'transforms understanding' of ancient port

(Phys.org) —Researchers from the universities of Cambridge and Southampton have discovered a new section of the boundary wall of the ancient Roman port of Ostia, proving the city was much larger than previously ...

Crowd-sourcing Britain's Bronze Age

A new joint project by the British Museum and the UCL Institute of Archaeology is seeking online contributions from members of the public to enhance a major British Bronze Age archive and artefact collection.

Scientists tether lionfish to Cayman reefs

Research done by U.S. scientists in the Cayman Islands suggests that native predators can be trained to gobble up invasive lionfish that colonize regional reefs and voraciously prey on juvenile marine creatures.

Leeches help save woman's ear after pit bull mauling

(HealthDay)—A pit bull attack in July 2013 left a 19-year-old woman with her left ear ripped from her head, leaving an open wound. After preserving the ear, the surgical team started with a reconnection ...

Six Nepalese dead, six missing in Everest avalanche

At least six Nepalese climbing guides have been killed and six others are missing after an avalanche struck Mount Everest early Friday in one of the deadliest accidents on the world's highest peak, officials ...