Sacked workers to open new wind turbine factory

Jul 25, 2010

Workers who lost their jobs when an Isle of Wight wind turbine factory closed down plan to open their own turbine plant on the same industrial estate as the former business.

More than 400 workers became redundant when Danish giant Vestas shut its Isle of Wight factory last year, sparking an 18-day sit-in at the factory in Newport.

The new company, Sureblades, will start producing micro wind turbine blades in September and will employ a number of ex-Vestas workers, according to founder Sean McDonagh, who was one of the protest's leaders.

A wind energy company in has placed the first order and McDonagh said he hopes to employ more than 40 workers within two years.

"It has been hard work but I always knew it was the right thing to do because it was crazy to lose jobs in the renewable energy industry," he said.

Some Vestas employees are still out of work and others have taken on short-contract jobs, McDonagh said, noting that unemployment on the Isle of Wight is over 3,500 but there are fewer than 200 job vacancies on the island.

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User comments : 7

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jerryd
5 / 5 (2) Jul 25, 2010
Way to go!! It's smart for workers to own the factory as they don't have to pay such CEO , ect overhead or shareholder profits, cutting out the parasites!!
marjon
1 / 5 (2) Jul 26, 2010
Way to go!! It's smart for workers to own the factory as they don't have to pay such CEO , ect overhead or shareholder profits, cutting out the parasites!!

Some one will have to be in charge. Should he be paid more?
If they organize like Nucor Steel, they may be successful.
ricarguy
3 / 5 (4) Jul 26, 2010
Way to go!! It's smart for workers to own the factory as they don't have to pay such CEO , ect overhead or shareholder profits, cutting out the parasites!!

Not only does someone have to run it, but someone has to own it. In general principles, CEO's and shareholders are NOT parasites and profits are not evil as some others might imply. It always makes sense for workers to have a small part of their financial investment into the company they work for. Profits are required either now or in the future to grow a business. Someone's comments above sounds a lot like he has been drinking the socialists' poison Kool-aid.

Back to the real story. Vestas is a large company that had taken a hit as part of the global recession but now seems to be recovering. (They still have a CEO and shareholders, by the way.) Curious the real reason why they closed that plant. That lesson should not be lost.

Best of luck to those picking up the pieces and trying anew.
Skeptic_Heretic
5 / 5 (1) Jul 27, 2010
Not only does someone have to run it, but someone has to own it.
The concept of incorporation says otherwise.

Several companies run by democracy, odd concept for a business but they're typically competitive and forward thinking as they include innovative concepts from all levels of the work force.
marjon
1 / 5 (3) Jul 27, 2010
Not only does someone have to run it, but someone has to own it.
The concept of incorporation says otherwise.

Several companies run by democracy, odd concept for a business but they're typically competitive and forward thinking as they include innovative concepts from all levels of the work force.

Shareholders are still owners. Successful businesses usually don't make decisions by majority vote. That is fairly well documented.
Decisions typically come down to one individual who is willing to accept responsibility. That is why such people usually get paid more.
Accepting responsibility for one's actions is so uncommon that business rewards and government punishes such responsible individuals.
tarheelchief
not rated yet Aug 11, 2010
I believe you might be correct regarding decisions being made.But the person making the decision should also accept the failure and resign,and depart from the marketplace.
Many people would be willing to accept responsibility at the wages given to presidents today.
The shareholders should not tolerate a high priced person who does not accept responsibility or listen to the heavy breath of competitors.
GM,Ford,and Chysler prove the leadership did not believe outsiders could make cars.Xerox and Kodak did not think anyone could enter their markets.
By saying the word successful you eradicate any chance of criticism.
marjon
not rated yet Aug 11, 2010
Many people would be willing to accept responsibility at the wages given to presidents today.

Recruiters are searching for such people. Of course they must bring some level of experience to the job.
But the person making the decision should also accept the failure and resign,and depart from the marketplace.

Maybe our politicians could lead by example. 75% of Congress should resign, but it will be better to fire them and have that on their record.
CEOs don't own the company and can be fired. Why doesn't that happen more often?