New research: Sugar substitutes help reduce caloric intake without overeating or hunger

Jul 22, 2010

A new study published in the August 2010 journal, Appetite, further demonstrates that people who consume low-calorie sweeteners are able to significantly reduce their caloric intake and do not overeat.

In fact, study participants who received the sugar substitutes instead of sugar consumed significantly fewer calories and there was no difference in hunger levels despite having fewer calories overall.

The researchers noted, "In conclusion, participants did not compensate by eating more at either their lunch or dinner meal and reported similar levels of satiety when they consumed lower calorie preloads [pre-meals] containing stevia or aspartame than when they consumed higher calorie preloads containing sucrose."

This study was conducted in both healthy and overweight adults and participants were given a pre-meal containing either sucrose, aspartame or stevia. Those who received the stevia or aspartame consumed fewer calories overall, did not overeat and did not report increased feelings of hunger.

"Although the totality of the scientific evidence demonstrates that low-calorie sweeteners and the products that contain them are not related to weight gain, increased hunger or overeating, there have been recent reports questioning the benefits of low-calorie sweeteners," notes Beth Hubrich, a dietitian with the Calorie Control Council, an international trade association. "When used as part of an overall , low-calorie sweeteners and light products can be beneficial tools in helping people control and weight."

"This human study, in addition to the many others, serves as a counter to the recent allegations about low-calorie benefits from epidemiological studies (which cannot show cause and effect) and studies performed in a small number of rats," adds Hubrich.

This study also builds upon a recent 2009 meta-analysis (evaluating 224 studies) published in the American and conducted by Mattes and Popkin. These researchers concluded, "A critical review of the literature, addressing the mechanisms by which non-nutritive [low-calorie] sweeteners may promote energy intake, reveals that none are substantiated by the available evidence."

Explore further: Nationwide study finds that people of color live in areas with more air pollution

More information: Anton, S et al. Effects of stevia, aspartame, and sucrose on food intake, satiety, and postprandial glucose and insulin levels. Appetite: 55 (2010) 37-43.

Provided by Kellen Communications

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Caliban
1 / 5 (1) Jul 22, 2010
I note the comment by the Calorie Control Council, and also wonder as to the funding source for the research itself.

Of the three sweeteners listed, Stevia is the only one that isn't associated(at least yet) with adverse health effects. This is assuming that the mention of sucrose is indeed a reference to corn syrup. Otherwise, the reference is highly puzzling, since sucrose is merely the chemical name of ordinary table sugar.

At any rate, this appears as nothing more than another industry effort to downplay the many well known risks associated with the consumption of products that are artificially sweetened. A quick web search will familiarize you, if you are currently unaware of them.
cisono
5 / 5 (1) Jul 23, 2010
Who financed this study? It is very bad practice of physorg.com not to report this.
Jigga
2 / 5 (4) Jul 23, 2010
..people who consume low-calorie sweeteners are able to significantly reduce their caloric intake and do not overeat.
It sounds logical, nevertheless many other studies are saying exactly the opposite - not saying about intrinsic toxicity of many artificial sweeteners.

http://www.cbsnew...99.shtml

http://www.medica...6849.php
Caliban
1 / 5 (1) Jul 23, 2010
..people who consume low-calorie sweeteners are able to significantly reduce their caloric intake and do not overeat.
It sounds logical, nevertheless many other studies are saying exactly the opposite - not saying about intrinsic toxicity of many artificial sweeteners.


That's right. My point exactly about the apparent bias. This research is nothing more than a strawman argument, funded by the industry, to provide the illusion of debate as to whether artificial sweeteners produce adverse heath effects. The answer to the question is: YES they do.

Aspartame was formerly classified as a chemical warfare agent by the Pentagon.

Mmm-mmm, Good!

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