New generation security body scanner unveiled by ThruVision Systems

Jul 19, 2010
Thruvision's unique passive security imaging technology (Credit: Thruvision Systems Ltd)

ThruVision Systems Ltd has officially launched the TS4, its new generation of compact security body scanner, at the Farnborough International Air Show in Hampshire.

A spin out from Science and Technology Facilities Council, ThruVision Systems' unique passive security imaging technology can detect explosives, liquids, narcotics, weapons, plastics and ceramics hidden under clothing and can image both metallic and non-metallic threat objects concealed on still or moving subjects, without revealing body details and also without radiating the person with energy. ThruVision System's technology functions by collecting a natural that is emitted by all people.

Combining all the groundbreaking features of ThruVision Systems' existing scanners with a significantly increased frame rate, improved image definition, a larger field of view and greater usability, the TS4 provides a more compact, yet more effective and powerful alternative to full body scanners.

The TS4 has been designed for use in both checkpoint and stand-off people screening applications and, being compact, can be deployed discreetly if required. Having already been trialled in a major European airport, the TS4 offers a viable solution for contraband detection by Customs agencies, amongst other applications. The TS4 has generated significant interest from a host of government agencies and the corporate security community.

David Haskett, ThruVision Systems' Product and Marketing Manager said: “We've worked closely with our existing customers during the evolution of the TS4 and feedback has been particularly positive, the product trials have been successful and initial market feedback has been very encouraging. We have focused on delivering a complete TS4 solution for our customers and offer a range of customised accessories which enable the systems to be integrated into existing infrastructures.”

Clive Beattie, CEO at ThruVision Systems added: “The launch of the TS4 is an important milestone in our history because it has been developed to meet specific customer requirements and the needs of the public.”

ThruVision Systems' passive imaging technology stems from a collaborative European Space Agency project, based on research carried out over many years by UK astronomers, including those at the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, to study dying stars.

Explore further: Identifying long-distance threats: New 3D technology could improve CCTV images

More information: You can visit ThruVision Systems at the Farnborough International Air Show, 19-25 July, Stand H3/D24.

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trekgeek1
not rated yet Jul 29, 2010
I wonder how well it detects ummmm.......... shall we say "internal cargo"?