Scientists to make detailed map of Calif. coast

Jul 19, 2010

(AP) -- Scientists will be using laser beams, computer software and airplanes to piece together what they say will be the most detailed map ever assembled of the California coastline.

State and federal scientists are set to begin work next month on a of the state's 1,200-mile coastline.

Doug George, a project manager with the state's Ocean Protection Council, says the images will be so detailed that the new map will identify boulders and telephone poles. The data gathered will be used to track ocean levels, and flooding risks.

The $3.3 million project will be supervised by the .

The work is expected to be finished in December, with the images posted to the Internet by next summer.

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