Clouds gathering over German solar sector: study

Jul 16, 2010
Solar modules stand in Hasborn, western Germany, where the biggest solar power system of Rhineland-Palatinate is opened in April 2010. Germany's once innovative solar energy sector seems to have lost some of its lustre and is increasingly being put in the shade by rivals in China and the United States, a study said on Friday.

Germany's once innovative solar energy sector seems to have lost some of its lustre and is increasingly being put in the shade by rivals in China and the United States, a study said on Friday.

In 2009, German groups accounted for 31 percent of solar generating equipment sold worldwide, said a statement issued by PRTM, an advisory group, compared with 53 percent of the market in 2006.

It attributed the decline to the fact that German firms did not react quickly enough to falling prices for installations.

Less expensive competitors in China and the United States increased their in the same period, PRTM said.

Chinese groups gained from 21 to 32 percent, while those in the US rose from nine to 21 percent.

Among the top 10 solar energy producers, the number of German firms has fallen from seven to three, while four Chinese companies are now in the top ten along with two from the US.

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trekgeek1
not rated yet Jul 18, 2010
Falling prices and we're still digging miles into solid rock for energy. Seriously, energy is beaming down on us, blowing through our hair, and we're surfing on it. Let's start using the energy that is being handed to us by the universe.
jerryd
not rated yet Jul 18, 2010
This is a good thing. It's not that Germans produce less but the whole world produces more.

The high subsidies Germans gave kept the panel price high for a decade. Now they have been cut, prices have dropped by 50%. Now for home use they are cheaper than retail coal prices. Good shopping will get PV panels for under $2/wt

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