Scott & White Healthcare study aimed at T-cell lymphoma

Jul 15, 2010

Scott & White's Cancer Research Institute (CRI) is conducting a clinical trial that targets malignant T-cell lymphoma, a type of blood cancer.

Lymphoma, which affects the white blood cells that normally protect against illness, is categorized either as B-cell or T-cell. About 85% of lymphomas are of B-cell origin, and 15% of T-cell origin. T-cell lymphomas are primarily chronic, but they do not respond well to chemotherapy.

Therefore, says Arthur E. Frankel, M.D., director of the Research Institute and director of Scott & White's Division of hematology/oncology, the need exists to find new agents that can selectively target and kill the malignant T-cells. The research agent under study at Scott & White contains diphtheria targeting malignant T-cells.

"This new targeted protein agent is designed to eliminate tumor cells resistant to chemotherapy," said Dr. Frankel. "The short course of treatment may improve quality of life if successful."

To date, 10 people have enrolled in the clinical trial. Scott & White's CRI will enroll up to 40 subjects to participate in this clinical trial to determine the safest doses for treatment of T-cell . Eligible subjects for the study must have failed previous treatment options.

T-cell malignant diseases include MF/Sezary Syndrome, T-cell LGL, PTCL, T-cell CLL, T-cell NHL, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphoma, nasal extranodal T-cell lymphoma, enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma, subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma, and hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma.

Explore further: Team identifies source of most cases of invasive bladder cancer

Provided by Scott & White Healthcare

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

News from Cancer: Risk factors for deadly form of lymphoma

Jul 07, 2008

A new study indicates that the incidence of mantle cell lymphoma, an aggressive type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, is on the rise, most frequently striking men, Caucasians and older individuals. The study, published in the August ...

Recommended for you

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance

5 hours ago

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered ...

Unraveling the 'black ribbon' around lung cancer

Apr 17, 2014

It's not uncommon these days to find a colored ribbon representing a disease. A pink ribbon is well known to signify breast cancer. But what color ribbon does one think of with lung cancer?

User comments : 0

More news stories

Less-schooled whites lose longevity, study finds

Barbara Gentry slowly shifts her heavy frame out of a chair and uses a walker to move the dozen feet to a chair not far from the pool table at the Buford Senior Center. Her hair is white and a cough sometimes interrupts her ...

How to keep your fitness goals on track

(HealthDay)—The New Year's resolutions many made to get fit have stalled by now. And one expert thinks that's because many people set their goals too high.

Low tolerance for pain? The reason may be in your genes

Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual ...

AMA examines economic impact of physicians

(HealthDay)—Physicians who mainly engage in patient care contribute a total of $1.6 trillion in economic output, according to the American Medical Association (AMA)'s Economic Impact Study.

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.