Iran unveils human-like robot: report

Jul 04, 2010
The first Iranian 'human-like' robot is seen at a conference centre in Tehran on July 3. Iran has developed the walking robot to use it for "sensitive jobs".

Iran has developed a new human-like walking robot to be used in "sensitive jobs," government newspaper Iran reported on Sunday.

Surena-2, named after an ancient Persian warrior, was unveiled by President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad on Saturday. It is 1.45 metres (4.7 feet) tall and weighs 45 kilograms (99 pounds), the report said.

"Walking slowly like human beings with regular arm and leg movements are among its characteristics," it said. "Such robots are designed and developed to be used in sensitive and difficult jobs on behalf of a person or as help."

The report did not elaborate on the robot's capabilities.

Iran has pursued a number of scientific projects in recent years such as cloning, stem cell research and satellite technology while it has come under increasing international pressure over its controversial nuclear programme.

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User comments : 29

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Noumenon
4.7 / 5 (50) Jul 04, 2010
Hmmm, looks a lot like the Asimo robot developed by the Japanese,.... but the Iranians wouldn't lie would they (sarcasm).
kasen
2.7 / 5 (6) Jul 04, 2010
Until further information is released, I'm going to assume that's a kid in a plastic shell.
ScientistAmauterEnthusiast
3 / 5 (2) Jul 04, 2010
Sensitive jobs? Are they sending it to negotiate its nuclear programs? (seriousness)

I wish they would hurry up and produce a home-bot, something to fetch drinks and use a vacuum cleaner, from what i have seen recently i can see no reason against.
DGBEACH
Jul 04, 2010
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
frajo
4.3 / 5 (6) Jul 04, 2010
Well, we should be glad at least, Arabians doesn't spend
Arabs, yes? Goodness, what is pushing you to show your lack of education on every occasion?
JamesThomas
4.3 / 5 (6) Jul 04, 2010
As has already been mentioned, I agree that this is nearly an exact replica of the Japanese ASIMO. Only a few small cosmetic differences and it looks like they added 4" to the upper legs to make it 4'7"s compared to the 4'3"s ASIMO. I bet every critical internal part has "Honda" printed on it.
otto1923
3 / 5 (4) Jul 04, 2010
(because they're running out of gullible "good-Muslims" who dream of "all those virgins"!)
No theyre running out of virgins-
wcarver
5 / 5 (6) Jul 04, 2010
"Well, we should be glad at least, Arabians doesn't spend all their oil money"

Uh, Iranians are Persian not Arabs. Further, the Iranians are probably the most educated people of the middle east second only to the Israelis
finitesolutions
Jul 04, 2010
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
fmfbrestel
3.7 / 5 (3) Jul 04, 2010
that particular robot may have been built by the Iranians, but not for a minute do i think that it wasn't a reverse engineering job of Asimo. Not that it wasn't very difficult anyway, just cause you know what parts go where doesn't mean it easy to put together/fabricate.
Hessi
4.7 / 5 (6) Jul 04, 2010
it is made by Tehran University and expended about 4.5 million dolars.
also, The iranians are persian, not arab.
wcarver
4.5 / 5 (2) Jul 04, 2010
I bet every critical internal part has "Honda" printed on it.

If the scientific/technical abilities of the Iranians is so substandard then why are we so concerned with their ability to produce a nuclear weapon which requires a bit more scientific acumen than building a robot?
DKoncewicz
4 / 5 (3) Jul 04, 2010
If the scientific/technical abilities of the Iranians is so substandard then why are we so concerned with their ability to produce a nuclear weapon which requires a bit more scientific acumen than building a robot?


I'm not exactly sure when the asimo was made but I'm sure it's more recent than the nuclear technology involved. Fission bombs have been around for seven decades, fusion bombs have been around for about six. The science for them was developed starting roughly in 1898.

While it's still a tremendous undertaking to build such a weapon, it is not a recent invention, and it is a far more worrying one than a robot that can wave and say hello especially in a nation ruled by a crazy theocracy.
antialias
4.1 / 5 (7) Jul 05, 2010
and it is a far more worrying one than a robot that can wave and say hello especially in a nation ruled by a crazy theocracy

You mean unlike the US?

Iran has long been a member of the scientific community with fairly regular publications in a number of high tech fields. Just because the political system is not to your liking doesn't mean that there can't be smart people, good education and outstanding scientific work.
baudrunner
5 / 5 (3) Jul 05, 2010
Countries that make "human-like" robots are actually showing off their understanding of gyroscopic-stabalization technology, the same technology that keeps missiles on trajectory to their targets and keeps rockets from spiralling out of control during launch. After that hurdle is passed, making walking robots is a breeze.
kasen
2.3 / 5 (3) Jul 05, 2010
outstanding scientific work


Bipedal robots aren't really that outstanding these days and this, along with the recent space launch, can hardly be called scientific, since no information is shared with the rest of the international community(no one really saw anything, just pictures). It's just a dictator showing off.

If I'd have been a smart Iranian scientist, I'd have spent 1 million $ on a slightly modified Asimo and used the remaining 3,5 million to fund a coup. In fact, I'm surprised no one tried to rig the bot with a bomb, or something. It must've been presented in front of a very select audience.
RobertKLR
5 / 5 (1) Jul 05, 2010
Iran is becoming the Jethro Bodine of the Middle East.
Quantum_Conundrum
3 / 5 (2) Jul 05, 2010
Yes, I was about to say it looked like a rip-off of the Japanese robot. I would not be surprised if it has many of the exact same parts.
otto1923
5 / 5 (1) Jul 05, 2010
I bet every critical internal part has "Honda" printed on it.

If the scientific/technical abilities of the Iranians is so substandard then why are we so concerned with their ability to produce a nuclear weapon which requires a bit more scientific acumen than building a robot?
Nukes are 60yo tech- not hard at all, especially with help.
CarolinaScotsman
Jul 06, 2010
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
otto1923
5 / 5 (1) Jul 09, 2010
In related news, Iran unveils robot-like human-
John_balls
3.7 / 5 (3) Jul 10, 2010
Iran has developed the walking robot to use it for "sensitive jobs".

What is a "sensitive job" by Iranian standards? Will it be pushing a button that launches a nuclear warhead...or wearing a specially fitted bomb-belt (because they're running out of gullible "good-Muslims" who dream of "all those virgins"!).
I wouldn't trust a word they (the Iranian gov't) say. The eradication of Israel is their agenda. And while I do believe them when they say the nuclear material they're producing is for their energy production, I'm not so naive to think that the "idea" hasn't crossed their minds...it would be too easy!

I wouldn't trust any word from u.s. government either.
yogurtforthesoul
not rated yet Jul 11, 2010
I'll probably get a bunch of ones, but here it goes!

Am I the only one that did a double-take when I saw the photo for this article? I was thinking to myself, "Great, now physorg is falling for Onion articles...".
DKoncewicz
5 / 5 (1) Jul 11, 2010
You mean unlike the US?

Iran has long been a member of the scientific community with fairly regular publications in a number of high tech fields. Just because the political system is not to your liking doesn't mean that there can't be smart people, good education and outstanding scientific work.


I didn't say anything about the intelligence of the people. I agree that the people in Iran are about as smart as you'll find in the middle-east aside from some of the people in Israel. That doesn't change the fact that they're a theocracy with a puppet governor and that the "supreme leader" controls the foreign policy-making. That is the part that is worrysome.

By the way, I'm not from the US so I don't really care what you say about them, but even though all their politicians have to suck up to god to get their presidential offices, at least they aren't secretly fully controlled by the pope. Don't get me wrong I think they're all crazy, just some more than others.
antialias
5 / 5 (2) Jul 12, 2010
That doesn't change the fact that they're a theocracy with a puppet governor and that the "supreme leader" controls the foreign policy-making. That is the part that is worrysome.

The point is: what has research into robots got to do with whether it's a theocracy (or a dictatorship or a democracy or whatnot).

Universities are universities. Iran universities don't have any other mathematics, engineering or computer sciences than any other university in the world.

It's not in the interest of even the most repressive regime to curb those areas (quite the contrary!). (Computer- ) Engineers make bad revolutionaries.

So why is anyone surprised that other countries besides the 'usual suspects' can do some serious science?
rah
1 / 5 (1) Jul 12, 2010
The Iranians decided to name their robot Asimo. It will attack anyone protesting against the government and it will self destruct around anyone of Jewish decent.
frajo
2.7 / 5 (3) Jul 12, 2010
So why is anyone surprised that other countries besides the 'usual suspects' can do some serious science?
Because some people don't have the processing power necessary to break down their prefabricated information.
The percentage of Iranians who understand English is considerably higher than the percentage of US Americans who understand Persian. Thus, the Iranians are better informed about the Western world than vice versa.
otto1923
3 / 5 (2) Jul 12, 2010
The percentage of Iranians who understand English is considerably higher than the percentage of US Americans who understand Persian. Thus, the Iranians are better informed about the Western world than vice versa.
Iran is a totalitarian state which routinely limits the contact its people have with the outside world. I would say your conclusion is unfounded and spurious, and that the opposite is probably true.
So why is anyone surprised that other countries besides the 'usual suspects' can do some serious science?
Insecure totalitarian regimes which directly control the kinds of research being done at state-run universities, would be more apt to demand that this research be done for propaganda purposes; and be more resistant to international peer review and up-close inspection.

Who knows what this gadget can do? Even if they had access to an asimo, chances are they could not duplicate most of it.
otto1923
not rated yet Jul 12, 2010
This is their mark 1 i think:
http://www.youtub...eJIDrzOE
Jigga
not rated yet Jul 12, 2010
Um, it's not even Asimo in any way - it's just solid box running at crawl speed. You can see some more realistic product there http://www.youtub...vY609OUZ
antialias
5 / 5 (2) Jul 13, 2010
Who knows what this gadget can do? Even if they had access to an asimo, chances are they could not duplicate most of it.

Don't bet on it. Reverse engineering is not rocket science. China has been reverse engineering everything they can lay their hands on successfully despite a - then - general lack of higher education in most of the population
(and before them Japan did it with western technology...and before them the US did it with german technology).

It is a tried and true method for getting your tech up to speed and eventually surpassing those you copy.
otto1923
not rated yet Jul 13, 2010
Asimo contains some very sophisticated electronics and programming. Even if they had an asimo they dont have access to the means of replicating either, or of acquiring them. Iran is not China, and it certainly is not Honda.