Austrian woman gets wrong leg amputated: reports

Jul 02, 2010

A 90-year-old woman who went in to get her leg amputated last month at a hospital in Sankt Johann, Tyrol, had the wrong limb removed, Austrian media reported Friday.

The patient, who suffered from vascular disease, was meant to have her leg amputated below the hip and went in for the operation on June 16.

After realised they had removed her healthy leg, the elderly woman finally had the correct limb amputated in a second operation a few days later, reports said.

The prosecution in Innsbruck has now launched an investigation for "injury by negligence," while the surgeon who handled the procedure has been suspended after 25 years on the job, the Austria Press Agency reported.

In a statement, the said human error as well as a breakdown in safety measures were to blame for the mistake, adding that it would "do everything to guarantee this incident is clarified without fault."

The patient's life was not in danger and she was due to leave hospital in the next few days, the reports said.

Her relatives had asked the hospital not to make the incident public, the management told the Kleine Zeitung newspaper, which first reported on it.

Explore further: Continued reliance on Windows XP in physician practices may threaten data security

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Grapefruit diet almost cost woman her leg

Apr 02, 2009

A woman who ate a grapefruit each day almost had to have her leg amputated because of a dangerous blood clot, according to an unusual case study reported in the Lancet.

Baby born from partial uterus

Sep 14, 2006

A 29-year-old Belgian woman has given birth a little more than a year after having part of her uterus removed during cancer treatment.

Woman wins lawsuit over sponge

Oct 05, 2007

A Florida jury has awarded more than $2.4 million to a woman whose doctor left a foot-long sponge in her pelvis after she gave birth.

Recommended for you

What are the chances that your dad isn't your dad?

13 hours ago

How confident are you that the man you call dad is really your biological father? If you believe some of the most commonly-quoted figures, you could be forgiven for not being very confident at all. But how ...

New technology that is revealing the science of chewing

Apr 15, 2014

CSIRO's 3D mastication modelling, demonstrated for the first time in Melbourne today, is starting to provide researchers with new understanding of how to reduce salt, sugar and fat in food products, as well ...

After skin cancer, removable model replaces real ear

Apr 11, 2014

(HealthDay)—During his 10-year struggle with basal cell carcinoma, Henry Fiorentini emerged minus his right ear, and minus the hearing that goes with it. The good news: Today, the 56-year-old IT programmer ...

Italy scraps ban on donor-assisted reproduction

Apr 09, 2014

Italy's Constitutional Court on Wednesday struck down a Catholic Church-backed ban against assisted reproduction with sperm or egg donors that has forced thousands of sterile couples to seek help abroad.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Quantum_Conundrum
not rated yet Jul 03, 2010
Lovely.

Such incompetence is insane. This entire surgical team should be fired and have their licenses revoked. This is one of the worst medical accidents ever.
Jayofalltrades
not rated yet Jul 03, 2010
She would sue, but she doesn't have a leg to stand on in court.

More news stories

Down's chromosome cause genome-wide disruption

The extra copy of Chromosome 21 that causes Down's syndrome throws a spanner into the workings of all the other chromosomes as well, said a study published Wednesday that surprised its authors.

How kids' brain structures grow as memory develops

Our ability to store memories improves during childhood, associated with structural changes in the hippocampus and its connections with prefrontal and parietal cortices. New research from UC Davis is exploring ...

Ebola virus in Africa outbreak is a new strain

The Ebola virus that has killed scores of people in Guinea this year is a new strain—evidence that the disease did not spread there from outbreaks in some other African nations, scientists report.