Egypt finds evidence of unfinished ancient tomb

Jun 30, 2010
In this undated photo released by the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities on Wednesday, June 30, 2010, Antiquities chief Zahi Hawass is seen inside an unfinished 570-foot long tunnel (174 meters) in Luxor, Egypt. Egypt's antiquities department has announced the completed excavation of the tunnel, first discovered in 1960 and possibly meant to be a secret tomb, stretching away from the main tomb of New Kingdom Pharaoh Seti I (1314-1304 B.C.), in the Valley of the Kings. (AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities)

(AP) -- Egyptian archaeologists who have completed excavations on an unfinished ancient tunnel believe it was meant to connect a 3,300-year-old pharaoh's tomb with a secret burial site, the antiquities department said Wednesday.

Egyptian chief archaeologist Zahi Hawass said it has taken three years to excavate the 570-foot (174 meter) long tunnel in Pharaoh Seti I's ornate tomb in southern Egypt's Valley of the Kings. The pharaoh died before the project was finished.

First discovered in 1960, the tunnel has only now been completely cleared and discovered ancient figurines, shards of pottery and instructions left by the architect for the workmen.

"Move the door jamb up and make the passage wider," read an inscription on a decorative false door in the passage. It was written in hieratic, a simplified cursive version of .

Elsewhere in the tunnel there were preliminary sketches of planned decorations, said Hawass.

Pharaoh Seti I (1314-1304 B.C.) was one of the founders of the New Kingdom's 19th Dynasty known for its military exploits and considered the peak of ancient Egyptian power. His tomb is famous for its colorful wall paintings.

Seti's son Ramses II built grandiose temples and statues of himself all over Egypt.

Hawass speculated that the tunnel and the secret tomb were not finished because of the pharaoh's death, but may have inspired a similar structure in Ramses II's tomb.

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GaryB
not rated yet Jun 30, 2010
That guy is not Zahi Hawass, it's clearly Indiana Jones.
JLPicard
not rated yet Jun 30, 2010
I wish he would take off that hat. He once precociously said that he is the real Tomb Raider. If he is going to denounce the fictional characters of Indiana Jones and Lara Croft then he should also find a dramatical indentity of his own. He is currently feeding off the celebrity status of these fictional characters. He should be paying royalties to the creators of these fictioanl characters.
SMMAssociates
not rated yet Jul 01, 2010
Dunno about the hat, but Hawass has been a decent spokesperson for the Egyptian Antiquities people, and who cares about the rest.

Anybody's guess what the tunnel is for, though.