Potential industrial and agricultural uses of echinacea trump health claims

Jun 29, 2010
This is an Echinacea plant. Credit: School of Science at IUPUI

Echinacea has been used for hundreds of years as an herbal remedy to prevent or treat colds, and today it is among the most commonly used herbal medicines in North America. However, in spite of its popularity, studies of the effect of the herb on the body's immune system are conflicting.

Now researchers from the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis are investigating the possibility that has other potentially more important uses - not in health, but in the fields of petrochemicals and agriculture.

Using the cutting edge tools of the newest "-omics" - metabolomics and transcriptomics - Robert Minto, PhD., associate professor of chemistry in the School of Science, is studying the of the herb, bioprospecting the plant's genes and enzymes.

"The goal of our National Science Foundation (NSF) funded project is to gain a better understanding of this plant, which in spite of its popularity, has not received the basic scientific scrutiny of so-called model plants like corn, rice and soy. We are identifying and mapping the complex biosynthetic , especially the alkamide pathway. We hope that this work will lead us to a better understanding of the plant's metabolic processes with wide-ranging application in such diverse fields as lubrication and design of disease-resistant plants," said Minto, who directs the IUPUI Signature Center for Membrane Bioscience.

According to Minto, the study of the unique metabolic characteristics of Echinacea and other natural plants should translate into the creation of novel bio-derived compounds.

Explore further: Four billion-year-old chemistry in cells today

Provided by Indiana University School of Medicine

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eurekalogic
not rated yet Jun 30, 2010
"creation of novel bio-derived compounds." Code word for patented cures instead of inexpensive tea.
MikeLisanke
not rated yet Jul 08, 2010
Supplement users are too smart to buy-into pharma's tactics (e.g. enhanced Omega-3s). The only concern is government over-regulation.