Image: Oil Slick in the Gulf of Mexico

Jun 23, 2010
Image credit: NASA

(PhysOrg.com) -- On Saturday, June 19, 2010, oil spread northeast from the leaking Deepwater Horizon well in the Gulf of Mexico. The oil appears as a maze of silvery-gray ribbons in this photo-like image from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite.

The location of the leaking well is marked with a white dot. North of the well, a spot of black may be smoke; reports from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say that and gas continue to be captured and burned as part of the emergency response efforts.

The large image (10 MB, JPEG) is at MODIS’ maximum spatial resolution (level of detail). Twice-daily images of the are available from the MODIS Rapid Response Team in additional resolutions and formats, including a georeferenced version that can be used in Google Earth.

Explore further: Coastal defences could contribute to flooding with sea-level rise

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