Migraine sufferers who experienced childhood abuse have greater risk of cardiovascular disease

Jun 23, 2010

Migraine sufferers who experienced abuse and neglect as children have a greater risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease including stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) among others, say scientists presenting data at the American Headache Society's 52nd Annual Scientific Meeting in Los Angeles this week.

In a multi-center, cross-sectional study of more than 1,300 headache clinic patients diagnosed with , investigators found a linear relationship between the risk of stroke, (TIA), MI, or all of these adverse outcomes and the total number of abuse types they experienced as children (physical, emotional or sexual abuse, or physical or emotional neglect.)

Patients in the study completed a self-administered electronic questionnaire which collected information on age, gender, race, highest educational level attained, , smoking status, history of childhood maltreatment, as well as self-reported physician-diagnosed CV conditions and risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and obstructive sleep apnea. The Questionnaire was used to assess physical, sexual, emotional abuse and physical, emotional neglect.

"It is clear from this work that early adverse experiences influence a migraine sufferers' cardiovascular health in adulthood," said Gretchen E. Tietjen, MD, of the University of Toledo College Of Medicine, who led the team from 11 neurology centers in the U.S. and Canada. "Other work has shown a link between childhood maltreatment and migraine and now we know that early abuse puts these adults at a greater risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease.

"Dr. Tietjen and her teams are pioneers in understanding the relationship between negative childhood experiences and migraine," said David Dodick, M.D., president of the AHS. "Now we need to drill even deeper to understand the relationship between migraine, aura status, childhood maltreatment and CV disease risk."

Explore further: New research shows people are thinking about their health early in the week

Provided by American Headache Society

4 /5 (1 vote)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Research: Migraine increases stroke risk

Oct 28, 2009

Migraine with aura (temporary visual or sensory disturbances before or during a migraine headache) is associated with a twofold increased risk of stroke, finds a study published in the British Medical Journal today. Further ...

Recommended for you

Suddenly health insurance is not for sale

21 hours ago

(HealthDay)— Darlene Tucker, an independent insurance broker in Scotts Hill, Tenn., says health insurers in her area aren't selling policies year-round anymore.

Study: Half of jailed NYC youths have brain injury (Update)

21 hours ago

About half of all 16- to 18-year-olds coming into New York City's jails say they had a traumatic brain injury before being incarcerated, most caused by assaults, according to a new study that's the latest in a growing body ...

Autonomy and relationships among 'good life' goals

Apr 18, 2014

Young adults with Down syndrome have a strong desire to be self-sufficient by living independently and having a job, according to a study into the meaning of wellbeing among young people affected by the disorder.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Treating depression in Parkinson's patients

A group of scientists from the University of Kentucky College of Medicine and the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging has found interesting new information in a study on depression and neuropsychological function in Parkinson's ...

Impact glass stores biodata for millions of years

(Phys.org) —Bits of plant life encapsulated in molten glass by asteroid and comet impacts millions of years ago give geologists information about climate and life forms on the ancient Earth. Scientists ...

Airbnb rental site raises $450 mn

Online lodging listings website Airbnb inked a $450 million funding deal with investors led by TPG, a source close to the matter said Friday.