Samsung Introduces High-speed 512GB SSD Utilizing New Toggle-mode DDR NAND Memory

Jun 17, 2010

Samsung Electronics today introduced the first solid state drive (SSD) utilizing high-performance toggle-mode DDR NAND. The new 512 gigabyte (GB) SSD provides electronic data processing application designers with advanced performance and reliability for notebooks with premium value.

“The highly advanced features and characteristics of our new SSD were obtained as a direct result of an aggressive push for further development of our flash technology, our SSD controller and our supportive SSD firmware,” said Dong-Soo Jun, executive vice president, memory marketing, . “Early introduction of this state-of-the-art toggle DDR solution will enable Samsung to play a major role in securing faster market acceptance of the new wave of high-end SSD technology,” he added.

The new 512GB SSD makes use of a 30 nanometer-class 32 gigabit chip that the company began producing last November. The toggle-mode DDR structure together with the SATA 3.0Gbps interface generates a maximum sequential read speed of 250 Megabyte per second (MBps) and a 220MBps sequential write speed, both of which provide three-fold the performance of a typical . At these speeds, two standard length DVD movies (approximately 4GB each) can be stored in just a minute.

Samsung provides further gains in by having developed a low-power controller specifically for toggle-mode DDR NAND. The resulting power throttling capability enables the drive’s high-performance levels without any increase in over a 40nm-class 16Gb NAND-based 256GB SSD. The controller also analyzes frequency of use and preferences of the user to automatically activate a low-power mode that can extend a notebook’s battery life for an hour or more.

The Samsung 512GB SSD makes use of reinforced 256bit AES (advanced encryption standard) encryption to ensure higher security, protecting personal data against online hackers or undesired access when its host PC is misplaced and lost.

Samsung also provides streamlined boot time and application access with this new SSD, showing an approximately nine-fold improvement in random performance over HDDs. Also, an intelligent operation management function optimizes the SSD’s background working environment. Coupled with the popular Windows 7 TRIM feature the operation management function secures the reliability of the drive in write mode.

Samsung plans to begin volume production of the 512GB SSD next month. The new capacity extends Samsung’s range of densities from 64GB to 512GB.

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vivcollins
not rated yet Jun 17, 2010
The whole idea of putting SSD on what basically is a legacy mechanical disc drive interconnect but has me wondering why! why do that? why not have this new SSD on a DIMM the same way we have RAM on DIMM arrays directly on the logic board
Arkaleus
not rated yet Jun 18, 2010
Vivcollins,

I'm sure that's the next step in motherboard and CPU design.

One thing I don't trust is "factory installed" encryption for anything. I'm sure that any preinstalled corporate encryption is transparent to the NSA or readily made so.

If you really want secure data you need to use your own encryption, like Truecrypt.

My greatest fear is that we are moving too much of our civilization's data into volatile storage forms that will be cmopletely unretreivable to future generations. All of our key technologies need to be preserved in EMP and war-proof forms so others can rebuild from them if necessary. I think of the vault for seeds in the arctic, or the museum vaults on the Motie's world in the book "Mote in God's Eye."
rgwalther
5 / 5 (1) Jul 08, 2010
Vivcollins,
All of our key technologies need to be preserved in EMP and war-proof forms so others can rebuild from them if necessary.
A very nice idea. the timing is somewhat akin to an unknown Amazon tribe stumbling upon a F-22 and deciding to float a pictograph log down the Rio Negro to ask for help in preserving the jet.

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