System 92L's chances for tropical development extremely diminished

Jun 16, 2010
The GOES-13 satellite captured this visible image of System 92L (right, center) on June 16 at 11:45 UTC (7:45 a.m. EDT) as a small rounded area of cloudiness in the Atlantic. Hispanola and Cuba are seen in the far right of this image (hundreds of miles away). Credit: NASA GOES Project

The possibility that System 92L in the Atlantic Ocean will bloom into the Atlantic's first tropical storm is now minimal because of strong westerly winds.

The GOES-13 satellite captured a visible image of System 92L on June 16 at 11:45 UTC (7:45 a.m. EDT) and it appeared as a small rounded area of cloudiness in the Atlantic.

GOES-13 was launched by NASA and is now operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). NASA's GOES Project at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. created the latest satellite image.

The showers and thunderstorms associated with the low pressure area known as System 92L have increased, but "strong westerly winds at upper levels are not making conditions favorable for tropical cyclone formation," according to the National Hurricane Center.

System 92L is located about 725 miles east of the Lesser Antilles. It is moving west-northwestward near 15 mph and will move northwestward.

The National Hurricane Center now gives System 92L a meager ten percent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours because of those strong westerly winds.

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jonnyboy
not rated yet Jun 16, 2010
and just 2 days ago this "storm" was going to destroy north america, amazing how f&:^:&*ked up these forecasters are and we are supposed to believe them when they scream AGW?