Casio mixes high-speed and HD video with solid photo features

Jun 14, 2010 Game Informer Magazine
The Exilim FH100

When you think of innovation, Casio probably isn't the first company on your list. But the company that was made famous by indestructible watches is also a reliable source for point-and-shoot cameras that hit a solid mix of quality and affordability. When digital cameras first burst onto the electronic scene, that's all they were: cameras. Today, we're seeing convergence in the devices with video and more. Casio has released a new line of Exilim cameras that step things up even further: high-speed video. Now consumers can record their cats jumping in 1,000 glorious frames per second.

We recently spent time with one of Casio's latest in the line: the FH100.

Priced at $349.99, the FH100 took great photos, crisp HD and provided endless entertainment with the high-speed video. While the speed can range all the way up to 1,000 frames per second, and light requirements take significant hits at that blazing recording rate.

However, the much lower 120 FPS is more than enough to slow down the real world and see how things really move. Switching back to the HD movie mode, users can shoot 720p videos that, with enough light, play back with surprisingly good quality. The only thing we didn't like was the lack of zooming while recording video.

The FH100 can also shoot uncompressed RAW photos that allow for much greater post-processing control in programs like Photoshop. This makes it a great stepping-stone for people not quite ready to jump up to a DSLR.

The 10-megapixel performed a bit better than its big and little brothers in the camera series, especially when we took it into manual exposure mode -- another nice ability packed into its compact body. While some of the processing was a bit slow, it was nothing we aren't used to with other cameras in this price range.

Overall, the Exilim FH100 is a feature-packed little machine with a great price. If you're looking for something to fit in your pocket that can capture all aspects of your life, take a look at Casio's latest.

Rating: 8/10

Details: $349.99; casio.com

Explore further: FINsix small-size laptop adapter uses special power platform

3 /5 (1 vote)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Nikon DSLRs can give eye-opening results

Feb 27, 2009

I am no camera buff. I bought my first digital camera only three years ago, and I often prefer to use the 2-megapixel camera in my iPhone than carry around another gadget.

World' First Transparent Ceramic Lens

Aug 02, 2004

CASIO, Inc., in conjunction with its parent company, CASIO COMPUTER CO., LTD., Tokyo, Japan today announced that using its proprietary optical technology, CASIO COMPUTER CO., LTD., has developed the world’s f ...

Recommended for you

Sony's PlayStation 4 sales top seven million

5 hours ago

Sony says it has sold seven million PlayStation 4 worldwide since its launch last year and admitted it can't make them fast enough, in a welcome change of fortune for the Japanese consumer electronics giant.

Study: Samsung phone durable, but iPhone has edge

Apr 14, 2014

Samsung's new Galaxy S5 smartphone is more durable than last year's model and other leading Android phones, but the iPhone 5s outperformed all of them in part because of its smaller size, a new study finds.

Invention loves collaboration at Milan show

Apr 14, 2014

Collaboration drove invention during Milan's annual International Furniture Show and collateral design week events, yielding the promise of homes without mobile phone chargers, and with more ergonomic seating, ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Net neutrality balancing act

Researchers in Italy, writing in the International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management have demonstrated that net neutrality benefits content creator and consumers without compromising provider innovation nor pr ...

Cosmologists weigh cosmic filaments and voids

(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have established that much of the stuff of the universe is made of dark matter, a mysterious, invisible substance that can't be directly detected but which exerts a gravitational ...

Bionic ankle 'emulates nature'

These days, Hugh Herr, an associate professor of media arts and sciences at MIT, gets about 100 emails daily from people across the world interested in his bionic limbs.