Study links cardiorespiratory fitness, stroke risk

Jun 03, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- A study by researchers at the University of South Carolina's Arnold School of Public Health has found that men with low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness are 60 percent more likely to die of stroke than men who are moderately fit or highly fit.

The findings of the study, led by John Siervedes, an Arnold School doctoral student, were presented June 2 at American College of Sports Medicine’s 57th annual meeting in Baltimore.

While who were physically active had fewer strokes, cardiorespiratory fitness was shown to be a more reliable predictor of stroke risk. Researchers analyzed data on 45,706 men aged 18 to 100 years, grouped as having low, moderate or high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness as measured by a maximal treadmill exercise test.

Based on self-reported information, participants were deemed as sedentary, walker-jogger-runners or sports participants. The study was controlled for age, cholesterol levels, diabetes, smoking, alcohol use and family history of cardiovascular disease.

The rate of fatal stroke among low-fit men was 3.2 per 10,000 man-years, compared with 2.0 for both moderately and highly fit men. Non-fatal stroke rates were 10.8, 8.9 and 6.4 for low, moderate and high fitness levels, respectively. Incidence of total stroke showed a strong inverse relationship with increasing levels of fitness. While men who ran, jogged, walked or played sports tended to have higher fitness levels, activity levels alone were not an independent predictor of stroke risk.

“These findings suggest that health professionals might consider assessing their patients’ cardiorespiratory fitness and counseling them to improve fitness levels to prevent stroke,” Sieverdes said. “While physical activity has been shown to reduce health risks, this study concluded that level was closely associated with stroke prevention.”

Data for the study came from participants who were enrolled in the Aerobics Center in Dallas, Texas, between 1970 and 2001 and had no history of , myocardial infarction or cancer at their baseline visits.

Explore further: Patient-centered medical homes reduce costs

Provided by University of South Carolina

4 /5 (2 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Moderate level of aerobic fitness may lower stroke risk

Feb 21, 2008

A moderate level of aerobic fitness can significantly reduce stroke risk for men and women, according to a large, long-running study presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2008.

Fitness levels decline with age, especially after 45

Oct 26, 2009

Men and women become gradually less fit with age, with declines accelerating after age 45, according to a report in the October 26 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. However, mainta ...

Recommended for you

Patient-centered medical homes reduce costs

10 hours ago

The patient-centered medical home (PCMH), introduced in 2007, is a model of health care that emphasizes personal relationships, team delivery of care, coordination across specialties and care settings, quality ...

New mums still excessively sleepy after four months

11 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—New mums are being urged to be cautious about returning to work too quickly, after a QUT study found one in two were still excessively sleepy four months after giving birth.

It's time to address the health of men around the world

12 hours ago

All over the world, men die younger than women and do worse on a host of health indicators, yet policy makers rarely focus on this "men's health gap" or adopt programs aimed at addressing it, according to an international ...

User comments : 0