NASA's Terra sees ash plume pulled to the northeast by a low

May 18, 2010
NASA's Terra satellite captured the ash plume from Eyjafjallajokull Volcano, Iceland, on May 18 at 12:20 UTC (8:20 a.m. EDT), blowing to the northeast due to a low pressure area. Credit: NASA Goddard / MODIS Rapid Response Team

NASA's Terra satellite continues to provide visible and infrared imagery of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull Volcano ash plume, and the most recent imagery showed the plume being pulled in a northeasterly direction over the island nation.

The brownish was being pushed to the northeast from a low pressure area situated to Iceland's northeast. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard Terra captured an image on May 18 at 12:20 UTC (8:20 a.m. EDT).

works with other agencies on using satellite observations to aid in the detection and monitoring of aviation hazards caused by .

As weather systems to continue to interact with the ash plume, it will continue to shift, so air travel may always be affected.

Explore further: NASA sees intensifying typhoon Phanfone heading toward Japan

More information: For more on this NASA program, visit: http://science.larc.nasa.gov/asap/research-ash.html.

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