Retinoid use not associated with fracture risk

May 17, 2010

Individuals treated for acne, psoriasis or another skin condition with vitamin A analogues (retinoids) do not appear to be at increased risk of fracture, according to a report in the May issue of Archives of Dermatology.

"High doses of vitamin A as dietary intake or supplements have been associated with adverse skeletal effects," the authors write as background information in the article. Very high doses of vitamin A analogues—compounds similar to vitamin A, including isoretinoin and acitretin—may be prescribed to patients for skin conditions. These medications have been associated with bone changes such as impaired markers of bone reconstruction and decreased bone mineral density.

Peter Vestergaard, M.D., Ph.D., Dr.Med.Sc., and colleagues at Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, used two nationwide registers to identify 124,655 patients with during the year 2000. For each of these patients, three persons who were the same age and sex but had not sustained a fracture were also selected. A register of medications purchased at pharmacies was then used to determine the use of systemic (affecting the entire body) or topical (applied to the skin) vitamin A analogues.

Neither topical nor systemic vitamin A analogues were associated with the change in at any skeletal site. There were no trends with increasing medication dose or with longer treatment duration, nor with either of the two types of analogues (isoretinoin or acitretin). Even very large daily doses—14 milligrams of vitamin A analogues—were not associated with an increased risk of fractures.

"Neither acne nor psoriasis, indications for systemic treatment with vitamin A analogues, influenced the risk of fractures," the authors write.

"It thus seems that vitamin A analogues are safe in terms of fractures even at very high doses," they conclude. "Even though some studies have reported a decreased with high doses of vitamin A as retinol in or as supplements, the decrease may not have been of such magnitude that it altered bone biomechanical competence."

Explore further: Distracted driving among teens threatens public health and safety

More information: Arch Dermatol. 2010;146[5]:478-482.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Low vitamin D linked to higher risk of hip fracture

Sep 20, 2007

Women with low levels of vitamin D have an increased risk of hip fracture, according to a study led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health presented this week at the 29th annual meeting of the American ...

Recommended for you

US judge overturns state's abortion law (Update)

13 hours ago

A federal judge on Wednesday overturned a North Dakota law banning abortions when a fetal heartbeat can be detected, as early as six weeks into pregnancy and before many women know they're pregnant.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Down's chromosome cause genome-wide disruption

The extra copy of Chromosome 21 that causes Down's syndrome throws a spanner into the workings of all the other chromosomes as well, said a study published Wednesday that surprised its authors.

Simplicity is key to co-operative robots

A way of making hundreds—or even thousands—of tiny robots cluster to carry out tasks without using any memory or processing power has been developed by engineers at the University of Sheffield, UK.

Progress in the fight against quantum dissipation

(Phys.org) —Scientists at Yale have confirmed a 50-year-old, previously untested theoretical prediction in physics and improved the energy storage time of a quantum switch by several orders of magnitude. ...