Water levels down in Canada's Saint Lawrence seaway

May 07, 2010
Tourists look at the Navy in Nova Scotia, Canada, in 2009. Seasonal water levels in the Saint Lawrence seaway -- a major North American shipping corridor -- have reached their lowest point in 40 years, the Quebec hydro center warned Friday.

Seasonal water levels in the Saint Lawrence seaway -- a major North American shipping corridor -- have reached their lowest point in 40 years, the Quebec hydro center warned Friday.

This follows one of the warmest Canadian winters on record, in which very little snow fell.

Hydrometric meters showed an average of 7,000 cubic meters per second (247,200 cubic feet per second) flowing past the island city of Montreal, much lower than the norm of 10,000 cubic meters per second (353,100 cubic feet per second) for this time of year.

Environment Canada said fish are likely to suffer the most. Pike, for example, spawn their eggs in flooded plains along the banks of the seaway that remained unusually dry this year.

Barges and ocean-going vessels that travel along the system of locks, canals and channels from the to the North American , have also had to reduce loads.

Alfred Jaouich, a researcher at the University of Quebec in Montreal (UQAM) blamed "a winter with little precipitation in the region of the Great Lakes," which hold 25 percent of the world's fresh water reserves, and other tributaries.

The Great Lakes themselves are also at record low , officials said.

Explore further: Weather service storm forecasts get more localized

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Quantum_Conundrum
not rated yet May 09, 2010
CAn someone explain the thermodynamics of how it is physically possible for the United States to have the coldest winter on record for liek 120 years, while Canada, the immediate neighbour, supposedly simultaneously had the hottest winter on record?
croghan27
not rated yet May 09, 2010
can you supply some documentation about this 'coldest winter in 120 years'. I live on the Canadian side of the seaway (closer to the US then Sara lives to Russia) and we had a rather warm, snowless winter.

It was cooler in Florida that usual - but I understand that California was warm.