Most common cancers in the world decreasing in Alberta: Study

May 03, 2010

It appears that people are listening to doctors' orders to protect their skin from the sun. In the largest Canadian study of non-melanoma skin cancer, Andrei Metelitsa, Gordon Jung and their research group have found skin cancer rates in Alberta are going down in men and have levelled off for women. This comes at a time when American scientists say that skin cancer rates are on the rise.

Metelitsa and Jung analyzed data collected over a 20-year period from nearly 100,000 patients diagnosed with the two most common cancers in the world. Those are basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. After a rapid spike in the late 1980s and early 90s, the number of cases has remained stable since 2000.

The research group believes trends seen in Alberta are representative of the entire Canadian population because the age-standardized incidence rates mirrors the national rate.

The dermatology residents have a few speculations on this trend. The result of strong awareness campaigns, which started more than 20 years ago, could be contributing to the observed stabilization of these cancers.

The study will be published in the British Journal of Dermatology.

Explore further: Six percent of colorectal cancer found to be interval tumors

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Physicians target the genes of lung, colon cancers

9 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—University of Florida physicians and researchers are collaborating to map the genes of different types of cancer, and then deliver medication to attack cancer at its source.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Down's chromosome cause genome-wide disruption

The extra copy of Chromosome 21 that causes Down's syndrome throws a spanner into the workings of all the other chromosomes as well, said a study published Wednesday that surprised its authors.

Researchers see hospitalization records as additional tool

Comparing hospitalization records with data reported to local boards of health presents a more accurate way to monitor how well communities track disease outbreaks, according to a paper published April 16 in the journal PLOS ON ...

Ebola virus in Africa outbreak is a new strain

The Ebola virus that has killed scores of people in Guinea this year is a new strain—evidence that the disease did not spread there from outbreaks in some other African nations, scientists report.