Improper use of opioids sparks a new Canadian practice guideline

May 03, 2010

Increases in opioid prescriptions, leading to increased misuse, serious injuries, and overdose deaths have spurred Canadian colleges of physicians and surgeons to create a new guideline for opioid use with chronic non-cancer pain, states an article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Opioid use in Canada has increased significantly, with a 50% increase in recorded prescription-opioid consumption between 2000 and 2004. Canada is now the world's third-largest consumer per capita.

In November 2007, Canadian medical regulators formed the National Opioid Use Guideline Group (NOUGG) and created the Canadian Guideline. Their goal was to help develop and implement a guidelineto provide physicians with information to prescribe opioids safely and effectively to patients with chronic non-cancer pain.

"The Canadian Guideline is intended to assist physicians with decisions to initiate appropriate trials of opioid therapy for patients with chronic non-cancer pain, to monitor long-term opioid therapy, and to detect and respond appropriately to situations of opioid misuse including addiction," write Clarence Weppler, Co-chair of the National Opioid Use Guideline Group and coauthors. "It was not designed to serve as a standard of care nor as a training manual."

The Canadian Guideline targets primary-care physicians and medical and surgical specialists who manage patients with chronic non-cancer pain. Pharmacists, nurses and dentists may also find it useful. The Guideline does not discuss treatment of with non-opioids.

Explore further: Allergan to cut 1,500 employees in restructuring (Update)

More information: The full guideline documents are available at nationalpaincentre.mcmaster.ca/opioid/

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KingDWS
not rated yet May 03, 2010
If you live here this is not a shock and the report is a bit deceptive. I have RA and the amount of opiates is only limited by how fast I use them. The government may track the use but the doctors do not and there is rarely any checks by the gp's for extended use effects or amounts. When I asked once about the amont I was allowed to have which seemed rather excessive I was told it didn't matter. Did find out that it was more than a terminal cancer patient was allowed. I gather it is easier to keep the population stoned and sedate instead of actually havng a medical system that deals with illness.