Sony's 'Dash' on sale now

Apr 30, 2010
Sony's 'Dash' on sale now

Sony today announced that its new Dash, a Wi-Fi touch screen device that pushes real-time, personalized Internet content to users in their homes or offices, is now available for about $199 nationwide.

Featuring a 7-inch color touch screen, Dash uses your existing wireless internet connection to provide a continuous display of your selections from over 1,000 free apps, many provided by chumby industries, inc., including news, calendars, weather, sports, and . In addition, through BRAVIA Internet Video, Dash can bring you TV episodes, films and additional video content and music from providers such as CBS, , , Pandora, Slacker and more.

Sony's Dash is always on and always fresh. No PC or smart phone needed, said Brennan Mullin, senior vice president of Electronics personal imaging and audio business. With a wide library of free apps automatically pushed to you as well as access to a diverse network of more than 30 video channels, Dash is a great example of how Sony delivers the latest and most exciting content into consumers homes.

With Dash, a playlist of your own personalized internet world is constantly refreshed and pushed to you, reducing the need to search for your favorite content or to log onto your favorite sites. Dash also allows you to wake up a whole new way with music videos, internet radio, or any available on the Dash instead of a traditional alarm clock buzzer.

Further, Dash can multitask. For example, if used on a kitchen countertop, internet radio can be playing in the background while you use your Dash to follow a recipe step-by-step.

Adding to Dash's content offerings, and Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia will each be offering apps for the Dash, displaying business news and market information as well as enabling you to access the highest quality simple recipes. In addition, Dr. Oz will provide a series of video health tips for Dash users.

Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia s app for the Sony Dash, titled Dinner Tonight Recipe of the Day, will come pre-loaded on the device and will provide a daily recipe from Martha Stewart s vast library of Everyday Food magazine recipes consisting of eight ingredients or less, as well as allow you the ability to utilize any of the daily Dinner Tonight recipes from the past month.

CNBC's app will also be pre-loaded in the Sony Dash and will feature real-time financial and business news, market information, stocks to watch, and more.

The video health tips provided by Dr. Oz are especially well suited for your wake-up experience. Each video is approximately one minute in length and provides specific steps you can take to live a healthier life.

Explore further: Lenovo's smart glasses prototype has battery at neck

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User comments : 3

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LuckyBrandon
not rated yet Apr 30, 2010
i can do all this from my phone...why buy another 200 device just because no phone would be needed. It doesnt eliminate the need for my phone, so I think I'll stick with my phone.
Skeptic_Heretic
5 / 5 (2) Apr 30, 2010
LB,

You may be able to use a phone for all of the above, as can I, but think of someone like my mother who's fairly technically inept. A touchscreen magic box of internets would be awesome for her. In addition to being of sufficient size that her RA won't prevent her from using it.
gwrede
not rated yet May 01, 2010
At first, I too dismissed the gadget as another harbinger of the era when we are pushed gadgets we don't need, that push "information" upon us that we don't need about things we don't need.

But the gadget could have a battery that takes it through the day with a nightly charge, is constantly on, and is truly wireless. You could use it as an internet radio, picture frame, watch episodes, news, YouTube HowTos, and it should also work with Skype.

Old people might come to love the gadget. It would be a "non-computer" for a multitude of actually useful tasks. It should be configurable and manageable by any average Joe or Jane, and usable by any child or truly elderly.

I'm starting to believe in this thing.