It's not what politicians say but what we hear

Apr 27, 2010

There is increasing evidence that individuals interpret the same election message in different ways, according to their personal political views, say experts in the British Medical Journal today.

Martin McKee, from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and David Stuckler from the University of Oxford argue that "it is possible for two well-informed groups of people faced with the same evidence to reach completely different conclusions about what should be done."

They highlight a recent American study where three groups who described themselves as either Democrats, or Independents were randomly given four versions of an authoritative news story about diabetes. The stories were exactly the same apart from how they described the causes of diabetes - one said nothing while the other three alluded to , individual lifestyle choices and social determinants such as economic status.

Interestingly, the Democrats and Independents were far more likely to agree with the social determinants explanation but this had no effect on the Republicans. Furthermore, the Democrats were significantly more likely than the Republicans to support action to tackle diabetes, such as restrictions on .

The authors also refer to a study on in Democrat and Republican research participants who were exposed to contradicting messages from both parties. They say: "Whereas those registered as Republicans clearly identified the contradictions voiced by Democrat politicians, they saw minimal contradiction in the statements by Republicans, and vice versa."

They conclude: "Politicians are often criticised for being all things to all people and for making promises that they then fail to keep. However … the problem may be less what the politicians are actually saying but rather how their words are heard and interpreted."

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hush1
not rated yet Apr 28, 2010
http://www.physor...483.html

Above is an underlying neurological extensional approach to Mr. McKee observations.

Chemistry and Gender, as well as political affiliation, require consideration.

I have overcome Heisenbergs' Uncertainty
Principle, in asserting that, had I
read this or not, all remains the same -
with 100% certainty. It is what mathematicians
call an empty set - a set that has the greatest
of all meaning, for all of mathematics. And yet,
Mr. McKee has done the impossible - extended the antonym for meaning. Congratulations. At least
there are ten people on earth who vaguely grasped Wiles'Proof. Mr. McKee goes beyond that. No human hedges hope to ever, or even understand the above. Perhaps by Nature, Mr. McKee willing, we will glimpse, beyond all time, that the above, did indeed, take place. :)

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