Tropical Storm 23S born in Southern Indian Ocean

Apr 02, 2010
The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite passed over Tropical Storm 23S on April 2 at 0913 UTC (5:13 a.m. EDT), and its rainfall was light to moderate (blue-green). Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce

According to data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, or TRMM satellite mostly light to moderate rain is falling in the latest tropical cyclone born in the waters of the Southern Indian Ocean. TRMM can measure rainfall from its vantage point in space as it orbits the Earth and forecasters will be using TRMM data to continue monitoring the storm's intensity.

Tropical Storm 23S was born today, April 2 about 260 nautical miles west of Cocos Island, Australia, near 11.5 South and 92.5 East. It has maximum sustained winds of 39 mph (35 knots) and is moving southward at around 6 mph (5 knots). Although Cocos Island is not in the direct path of the storm, it was being affected with by thunderstorms in the storm's outer bands.

When the TRMM satellite passed over 23S on April 2 at 0913 UTC (5:13 a.m. EDT) it measured light to moderate rainfall. Since then, indicated that bands of thunderstorms have consolidated around the center of 23S's center of circulation. is likely going to intensify in the system as it strengthens over the weekend. At times rain may be falling in some areas of the storm at up to 2 inches per hour.

Over the weekend, 23S is forecast to track south and intensify, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. By Monday, 23S will run into a mid-latitude trough, or extended area of low pressure that will weaken it.

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