Health premiums could rise 17 pct for young adults

Mar 29, 2010 By CARLA K. JOHNSON , AP Medical Writer

(AP) -- Health insurance premiums for young adults are expected to rise about 17 percent once they're required to buy insurance four years from now. That estimate is from an analysis by Rand Health.

Young people will need to carry more of the burden of under the new health overhaul law. The new law limits an industry practice of charging older customers more.

Even so, the pluses could outweigh the minuses. Some 2 million people under age 26 should qualify for coverage under their parents' health plans. And Medicaid expansion will insure 9 million more young adults.

Explore further: Tax forms could pose challenge for HealthCare.gov

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