Laser security for the Internet

Mar 23, 2010

A British computer hacker equipped with a "Dummies" guide recently tapped into the Pentagon. As hackers get smarter, computers get more powerful and national security is put at risk. The same goes for your own personal and financial information transmitted by phone, on the Internet or through bank machines.

Now a new invention developed by Dr. Jacob Scheuer of Tel Aviv University's School of Electrical Engineering promises an information security system that can beat today's hackers -- and the hackers of the future -- with existing fiber optic and computer technology. Transmitting binary lock-and-key information in the form of light pulses, his device ensures that a shared key code can be unlocked by the sender and receiver, and absolutely nobody else. He will present his new findings to peers at the next laser and electro-optics conference this May at the Conference for Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) in San Jose, California.

"When the RSA system for security was introduced in the 1970s, the researchers who invented it predicted that their 200-bit key would take a billion years to crack," says Dr. Scheuer. "It was cracked five years ago. But it's still the most secure system for consumers to use today when shopping online or using a bank card. As computers become increasingly powerful, though, the idea of using the RSA system becomes more fragile."

Plugging a leak in a loophole

Dr. Sheuer says the solution lies in a new kind of system to keep prying eyes off secure information. "Rather than developing the lock or the key, we've developed a system which acts as a type of key bearer," he explains.

But how can a secure key be delivered over a non-secure network -- a necessary step to get a message from one user to another? If a hacker sees how a key is being sent through the system, that hacker could be in a position to take the key. Dr. Sheuer has found a way to transmit a binary code (the key bearer) in the form of 1s and 0s, but using light and lasers instead of numbers. "The trick," says Dr. Scheuer, "is for those at either end of the fiber optic link to send different laser signals they can distinguish between, but which look identical to an eavesdropper."

New laser is key

Dr. Scheuer developed his system using a special laser he invented, which can reach over 3,000 miles without any serious parts of the signal being lost. This approach makes it simpler and more reliable than quantum cryptography, a new technology that relies on the quantum properties of photons, explains Dr. Scheuer. With the right investment to test the theory, Dr. Scheuer says it is plausible and highly likely that the system he has built is not limited to any range on earth, even a round-the-world link, for international communications.

"We've already published the theoretical idea and now have developed a preliminary demonstration in my lab. Once both parties have the key they need, they could send information without any chance of detection. We were able to demonstrate that, if it's done right, the system could be absolutely secure. Even with a quantum computer of the future, a hacker couldn't decipher the key," Dr. Scheuer says.

Explore further: PsiKick's batteryless sensors poised for coming 'Internet of things'

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Secure Communication via Space

Apr 22, 2008

The exchange of information between distant sources is the basis of all communications, but quantum mechanics may open up this distant exchange as never before.

Fighting tomorrow's hackers

Feb 05, 2009

One of the themes of Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code is the need to keep vital and sensitive information secure. Today, we take it for granted that most of our information is safe because it's encrypted. Every time we use a ...

Eureka Prize for secure information breakthrough

Aug 23, 2006

One of Australia’s top science prizes has been awarded to researchers based at The Australian National University who have developed a fast and totally secure way to transmit information using laser beams.

Recommended for you

Lifting the brakes on fuel efficiency

8 hours ago

The work of a research leader at Michigan Technological University is attracting attention from Michigan's Governor as well as automotive companies around the world. Xiaodi "Scott" Huang of Michigan Tech's ...

Large streams of data warn cars, banks and oil drillers

Apr 16, 2014

Better warning systems that alert motorists to a collision, make banks aware of the risk of losses on bad customers, and tell oil companies about potential problems with new drilling. This is the aim of AMIDST, the EU project ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

trekgeek1
not rated yet Mar 23, 2010
I am not a security expert, but it seems that you must still establish a communication protocol to determine the unique frequencies that are recognized. A hacker could theoretically intercept that communication and then be able to distinguish between the frequencies. The weak link seems to be that no matter how complex your security encryption is, you still need to set up your communication protocol over a weakly secured network before you can secure it. This appears to be a fundamental flaw with all systems.

I think the only way to do it is to ensure that there is some margin of difficulty in intercepting any code. A simple delay of even seconds, in which the transmitter and receiver can continuously vary their frequencies and codes too quickly for the hacker to keep up. It really seems that the hacker must have it more difficult, and this may mean he has to play catch up.

More news stories

LinkedIn membership hits 300 million

The career-focused social network LinkedIn announced Friday it has 300 million members, with more than half the total outside the United States.

Suddenly health insurance is not for sale

(HealthDay)— Darlene Tucker, an independent insurance broker in Scotts Hill, Tenn., says health insurers in her area aren't selling policies year-round anymore.