Final Report Confirms Cluster of Oseltamivir (Tamiflu)-Resistant H1N1 Influenza at Duke Hospital

Mar 22, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- An outbreak last fall of oseltamivir (Tamiflu)-resistant H1N1 influenza at Duke University Hospital may have been the result of viral transmission between patients.

Four patients in a hematology-oncology ward at Duke University Hospital became symptomatic of fever and respiratory symptoms during a six-day period from October 6-11, 2009. They were subsequently diagnosed with oseltamivir-resistant influenza.

All four patients were ill with underlying severely compromised immune systems and other complex medical conditions.

Duke and a team of experts from the (CDC) and the State of North Carolina Public Health Department collaborated to investigate the nature of these cases. Their findings were presented at the Fifth Decennial International Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections on March 20 in Atlanta, Georgia.

“We found that the oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 influenza were isolated to the four patients. There was no evidence of spread to additional patients or caregivers on the affected ward,” said Luke Chen, MD, an infectious diseases specialist at Duke University Medical Center.

The team carried out an epidemiologic investigation and extensively reviewed patients’ medical records, infection control measures, and interviewed visitors and health care personnel.

“We were not able to establish that health care workers or visitors had a role in the transmission.”

“We found that our infection control plans were properly implemented,” Chen said. “The compliance to is monitored by objective auditors at Duke Hospital. The hand hygiene compliance on the affected ward was greater than 92 percent during the study period -- much higher than reports from other institutions. We also implemented contact isolation in addition to droplet precautions for severely immunocompromised patients. At the time of the four infections, the hospital was also operating with a visitor restriction policy, which recommended visits only from adult members of the patient’s immediate family or designated caregivers.”

Among hospitalized patients, influenza can often be hidden under other conditions and the suspicion for influenza might be low because many patients have other medical problems that could be causing their fever or respiratory symptoms, according to Chen.

“One key thing we can learn from this outbreak is that all clinicians and health care workers should suspect the diagnosis of influenza even among very ill patients, who have multiple medical problems,” Chen said. “We should include in the diagnostic thought process early on and act on it by doing specific tests and placing these patients in appropriate isolation prior to obtaining the results of these tests.”

Explore further: Philippines boosts MERS monitoring after UAE nurse scare

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Drug-resistant swine flu cluster on Vietnam train

Dec 09, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- A cluster of seven people infected with a Tamiflu-resistant strain of pandemic H1N1 influenza has been identified in Vietnam by a team including Oxford researchers.

Recommended for you

Filipino tests negative for Middle East virus

10 hours ago

A Filipino nurse who tested positive for the Middle East virus has been found free of infection in a subsequent examination after he returned home, Philippine health officials said Saturday.

US orders farms to report pig virus infections

Apr 18, 2014

The U.S. government is starting a new program to help monitor and possibly control the spread of a virus that has killed millions of pigs since showing up in the country last year.

Foreigner dies of MERS in Saudi

Apr 18, 2014

A foreigner has died after she contracted MERS in the Saudi capital, the health ministry said on announced Friday, bringing the nationwide death toll to 73.

Vietnam battles fatal measles outbreak

Apr 18, 2014

Vietnam is scrambling to contain a deadly outbreak of measles that has killed more than 100 people, mostly young children, and infected thousands more this year, the government said Friday.

New clues on tissue scarring in scleroderma

Apr 18, 2014

A discovery by Northwestern Medicine scientists could lead to potential new treatments for breaking the cycle of tissue scarring in people with scleroderma.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Temple
not rated yet Mar 23, 2010
Yeah, but the none-too-small risk of a seriously deadly H1N1 (or other disease) outbreak is a safer bet than subjecting oneself to the effects that the 'toxic' substance that used to be in vaccines never actually caused.

More news stories

Filipino tests negative for Middle East virus

A Filipino nurse who tested positive for the Middle East virus has been found free of infection in a subsequent examination after he returned home, Philippine health officials said Saturday.

Study says we're over the hill at 24

(Medical Xpress)—It's a hard pill to swallow, but if you're over 24 years of age you've already reached your peak in terms of your cognitive motor performance, according to a new Simon Fraser University study.

NASA's space station Robonaut finally getting legs

Robonaut, the first out-of-this-world humanoid, is finally getting its space legs. For three years, Robonaut has had to manage from the waist up. This new pair of legs means the experimental robot—now stuck ...

Ex-Apple chief plans mobile phone for India

Former Apple chief executive John Sculley, whose marketing skills helped bring the personal computer to desktops worldwide, says he plans to launch a mobile phone in India to exploit its still largely untapped ...

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...

Airbnb rental site raises $450 mn

Online lodging listings website Airbnb inked a $450 million funding deal with investors led by TPG, a source close to the matter said Friday.