Teen Girls Look to Peers to Gauge Weight Goals

Mar 16, 2010 By Glenda Fauntleroy

Their schoolmates' weight determines whether teenage high school girls will try to lose pounds, new research finds, and the school environment plays a big role in the decision.

Although fashion magazines and celebrity culture equate ‘thin’ with ‘beautiful,’ the study in the March issue of Journal of Health and Social Behavior found that tend to view their in comparison to the peers they see every day in school — and being overweight might be perfectly fine.

“Our findings provide evidence that girls’ weight-control behaviors are more complicated than often assumed,” said lead study author Anna Mueller, at the University of Texas at Austin. “Every school does not have the same emphasis on being thin and losing weight, and even within schools, girls respond to the school culture differently.”

The researchers used data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, which contains a national sample of adolescents in grades 7 to 12 in 132 middle and high schools across the country. The researchers evaluated information given by about 4,000 adolescent high school girls.

Mueller and her colleagues looked at responses to the question, “Are you trying to lose weight, gain weight or stay the same?” They also considered each girl’s self-reported (BMI) to determine who was overweight or underweight, according to standards set by the .

The study found most girls would behave in the manner if a majority of their peers of the same size were doing the same. For example, girls in schools with a higher average female BMI are less likely to try . On the other hand, an average-weight girl would be increasing likely to say she is trying to lose weight as the number of underweight girls in her school rose.

“What our findings showed was that girls were more aware of what others like them were doing,” said Mueller. “Underweight girls were not likely to be trying to lose weight, unless they were in schools where underweight girls regularly reported trying to lose weight.”

Jeanie Alter, lead evaluator of the Indiana Prevention Resource Center at Indiana University’s School or Health, Physical Education, and Recreation echoed Mueller’s point. Alter specializes in adolescent health.

“It is not surprising that girls’ behavior would be influenced by the behaviors of their peers, whether they be perceived or real,” said Alter. “This is true for many types of behaviors including risky behaviors, such as substance use. Perceptions that ‘everyone is doing it’ are powerful motivators.”

The researchers concluded that because schools could play such an important role in a girl’s decision about weight control, the school environment offers the optimal opportunity to educate about body image and healthy behaviors.

Explore further: Report shows use of care plans in UK is rare with limited benefits

More information: Mueller AS, et al. Sizing up peers: adolescent girls’ weight control and social comparison in the school context results of a factorial priming experiment. J Health Social Behav 51(1), 2010.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Does this make me look fat?

Jul 01, 2008

The peer groups teenage girls identify with determine how they decide to control their own figure. So reports a new study by Dr. Eleanor Mackey from the Children's National Medical Center in Washington DC, and her colleague ...

“Feeling Fat” Is Worse Than Being It

Jun 20, 2008

In the course of the KiGGS study, almost 7000 boys and girls aged between 11 and 17 years were weighed and asked about their self-assessment, ranging from “far too thin” to “far too fat.” In addition, they all completed ...

Recommended for you

Students' lunches from home fall short

49 minutes ago

School lunch is a hot topic. Parents, administrators and policymakers are squaring off on federal guidelines requiring schools to serve healthier, more affordable and ecologically sustainable meals. No matter how they pan ...

US judge blocks enforcement of new abortion law

3 hours ago

A federal judge has temporarily blocked Louisiana from enforcing its restrictive new abortion law. But lawyers and advocates appeared to disagree about whether the judge's order affects doctors at all five abortion clinics ...

New toilets for India's poor, crime-hit village

Aug 31, 2014

More than 100 new toilets were unveiled Sunday in a poverty-stricken and scandal-hit village in northern India, where fearful and vulnerable women have long been forced to defecate in the open.

User comments : 0