Aspirin-like Drug Could Help Control Diabetes

Mar 16, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Researchers at Tulane University School of Medicine are participating in a national study testing the ability of a generic drug called salsalate to control diabetes.

The multi-site study is led by the Joslin Center, Boston, with 17 institutions around the country, including Tulane, involved in clinical testing of the drug. The study's current results are published in the March 16 edition of The .

“Salsalate been prescribed for the joint pain of arthritis for many years,” says Dr. Vivian Fonseca, Tullis-Tulane Alumni Chair in Diabetes; chief, Section of Endocrinology; and principal investigator for the study at Tulane. “It is an anti-inflammatory agent that is chemically similar to aspirin, but it is easier on the stomach.”

The three-month-long trial, funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health, tracked responses to salsalate by more than 100 individuals aged from 17 to 75 years. Patients who took the drug showed significantly improved blood glucose levels, an indication that salsalate may be beneficial in controlling diabetes.

“This is an important study for several reasons,” says Fonseca. “First, it represents a novel twist to what has been described in the literature for years as a ‘side effect' — this drug can cause low blood sugars in people with diabetes who take it along with other medications. We are turning this ‘side effect’ into a benefit in helping patients with diabetes control their disease. Second, similar drugs were used to treat diabetes over a century ago in Germany before the discovery of insulin and other drugs. We have ‘rediscovered’ the concept but have now applied it in a modern scientific manner in a properly conducted clinical trial.”

With continued funding from the NIH, the team is moving ahead with a second clinical trial. Volunteers are being recruited for this stage, which will study efficacy and safety of salsalate in a larger group for a longer period of time.

Explore further: Greater emphysema-like lung on CT linked to mortality

More information: Those interested in participating in the study should call Connie Tompkins, 504-988-4651.

Related Stories

FDA approves new diabetes treatment

Oct 17, 2006

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of Januvia tablets as the first in a new class of diabetes drugs.

Studies test new approaches to islet transplantation

May 01, 2008

Researchers from 11 medical centers in the United States, Canada, Sweden, and Norway have begun testing new approaches to transplanting clusters of insulin-producing islets in adults with difficult-to-control type 1 diabetes. ...

30-year study shows benefits of glucose control

Sep 11, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- A large-scale, 30-year study by Oxford University has shown improved blood glucose control in type 2 diabetes leads to greater benefits in the longer term. The findings, to be published in the New England Jo ...

Recommended for you

New hope for rare disease drug development

1 hour ago

Using combinations of well-known approved drugs has for the first time been shown to be potentially safe in treating a rare disease, according to the results of a clinical trial published in the open access Orphanet Journal of ...

Three weeks since last Ebola case in Mali: WHO

4 hours ago

Mali has not had a case of Ebola for three weeks, the World Health Organization said Wednesday, completing one of the two incubation periods the country needs to be declared free of the virus.

Migraine may double risk for facial paralysis

5 hours ago

Migraine headache may double the risk of a nervous system condition that causes facial paralysis, called Bell's palsy, according to a new study published in the December 17, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journa ...

Anti-diabetic drug springs new hope for tuberculosis patients

12 hours ago

A more effective treatment for tuberculosis (TB) could soon be available as scientists have discovered that Metformin (MET), a drug for treating diabetes, can also be used to boost the efficacy of TB medication without inducing ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.