Powerful Cyclone Tomas battering Northern Fiji islands

Mar 15, 2010
NASA's AIRS instrument provided an infrared look at Tomas' cold thunderstorm cloudtops (blue and purple) on March 14 at 0135 UTC. The storm is more than 300 miles in diameter. The AIRS image gives a viewer a good idea of the size of the storm. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

Tomas grew into a monster Category 4 cyclone and thrashed the northern Fiji Islands with heavy rains and maximum sustained winds of up to 170 mph (275 km). The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of most of Cyclone Tomas on Mar. 14 10:21 p.m. ET and noticed the storm's eye is cloud-filled.

Another instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite measured the cloud top temperatures of Tomas' thunderstorms, and revealed very high, cold thunderstorms (as cold as minus 63 degree Fahrenheit) surrounding Tomas' 34-mile in diameter-wide-eye. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument showed forecasters that the thunderstorm "engine" in Tomas' center was very powerful with strong thunderstorms, dropping heavy rainfall.

Tomas has already caused damages for residents of the northern Fiji islands. Damage reports are still coming in, but power losses and flooding have been reported. Evacuations have taken place in Labassa, Wainiika, Nuku and Vatu because of flooding. Other reports indicate that schools and government buildings have been closed. Tourists were evacuated and flights have been temporarily canceled to and from Fiji's main airport.

At 0828 UTC March 15 (4:28 a.m. EDT), Tomas was packing near 120 mph (105 knots). The center of the storm was approximately 200 nautical miles northeast of Nadi, Fiji, near 16.1 South and 179.5 West. Tomas is moving south at 7 mph (6 knots). Tomas' estimated minimum central pressure was 930 millibars.

Cyclone-force winds extend 40 miles out from the center, while tropical storm-force winds extend out 150 miles from the center, making the storm 300 miles in diameter. Tomas' eye is 30 nautical miles (34 miles) in diameter.

shows that Tomas has maintained its banding or wrapping around of thunderstorms around the storm's low-level center of circulation. As Tomas continues to track in a southerly direction over the next day and a half, it is forecast to intensify a little (due to the warm ocean waters it will be passing through), then will run into increasing wind shear which will weaken the storm.

Explore further: Study of Chile earthquake finds new rock structure that affects earthquake rupture

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Tropical Storm Tomas approaching Nadi this weekend

Mar 12, 2010

Tropical Storm Tomas is on a southern track in the South Pacific Ocean, and residents of Nadi, Fiji will be watching it as it approaches the eastern side of the island late this weekend. A tropical cyclone ...

Tropical Storm Oli kicking up waves in south Pacific

Feb 02, 2010

Tropical Storm Oli is headed between the islands of Bora Bora and Raratonga in the South Pacific, while maintaining its intensity as a tropical storm. Infrared satellite data from NASA's Aqua satellite reveals ...

Cyclone Cleo has reached its maximum wind speed

Dec 09, 2009

NASA Satellites noticed that Tropical Cyclone Cleo had reached its maximum strength, and was now moving into areas that will weaken it. Cleo's maximum sustained winds were near 115 mph (100 knots), with gusts ...

Recommended for you

NASA sees remnants of Nilofar go to cyclone graveyard

18 hours ago

Wind shear has caused the demise of former Tropical Cyclone Nilofar in the northern Arabian Sea. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Nilofar on Oct. 31 and captured an image that shows strong wind shear has ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.