Oscillations at odds in the heart

Mar 15, 2010

Researchers in Germany show that a classical biological oscillator, the glycolytic oscillator, may increase damage to the heart during acute loss of oxygen (anoxia), and as may occur during ischemia. The study appears online March 15 in the Journal of General Physiology.

Oscillations are important in many biological processes, and life could not exist without them. They play roles in the cell cycle, the , circadian rhythms, and fertility cycles, to name a few. Although oscillations are vital for normal physiological functions, uncontrolled or irregular oscillations can have harmful effects. This may be true of glycolytic oscillations that occur during anoxia and ischemia in the heart.

Glycolytic oscillations have been studied in the past, but only in artificially induced conditions. Klaus Benndorf and his team from the University of Jena were able to create more clinically relevant conditions by using a technique that allowed a single isolated patch-clamped cell to be imaged with during severe anoxia.

According to James Weiss and Jun-Hai Yang (UCLA) in a Commentary accompanying the paper, the next step will be to determine whether such metabolic oscillations can be detected during acute ischemia in the intact heart, and if so, whether they play a role in hastening .

Explore further: Goalkeepers prone to 'gambler's fallacy' but penalty takers fail to exploit it

More information: Ganitkevich, V., V. Mattea, and K. Benndorf. 2010. J. Gen. Physiol. doi:10.1085/jgp.200910322. Weiss, J.N., and J.-H. Yang. 2010. J. Gen. Physiol. doi:10.1085/jgp.201010422

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

What makes the heart 'tick-tock'

Dec 02, 2008

Researchers have new evidence to show that the heart beats to its own drummer, according to a report in the December issue of the journal Cell Metabolism. They've uncovered some of the molecular circuitry within the cardio ...

New therapy could preserve vessel function after heart attack

Sep 10, 2007

Scientists have identified the process that causes blood vessels to constrict during and after a heart attack. They've also demonstrated that delivering a vital molecule that is depleted during this process directly to those ...

Rare disease provides clues about enzyme role in arrhythmias

Dec 11, 2008

A University of Iowa study provides insight into a calcium-sensing enzyme already known to play a role in irregular heartbeats and other critical functions. The researchers showed that the enzyme, calmodulin kinase II (CaM ...

Study reveals new data on circadian rhythms

May 07, 2009

Fluctuations in light intensity allow restoring the regularity of circadian rhythms. This is the main conclusion of the work carried out by Javier Buceta, group leader of The SiMBioSys Group (Theoretical and In Silico Modelling ...

Recommended for you

New book examines the known and unknown about OCD

1 hour ago

A new and thorough overview of a disturbing behavioural condition that will affect 2.3 per cent of the UK population in their lifetime has been written by University of Sussex researchers.

Ibuprofen relieves women's hurt feelings, not men's

3 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—For years, researchers have known that physical pain relievers such as ibuprofen can also help ease emotional pain, but new research suggests that ibuprofen has contrasting effects on men ...

User comments : 0