Sony unveils new motion contoller to slow Nintendo

Mar 11, 2010 By TOMOKO A. HOSAKA , Associated Press Writer
In this undated image released by Sony Computer Entertainment Inc., Sony's new motion controller is shown. The Japanese maker of the PlayStation 3 unveiled Thursday, March 10, 2010, its highly anticipated motion controlling system, as it takes aim at Nintendo's dominance in the gaming sector. Used with the existing PlayStation Eye camera, the new wireless motion controller can track players' body movements. The controller, in turn, has on its end a light-emitting orb that is recognized by the camera. (AP Photo/Sony Computer Entertainment Inc.)

(AP) -- Sony has a new message for Nintendo Wii gamers: Come join us.

The Japanese maker of the PlayStation 3 unveiled Thursday its highly anticipated motion controlling system, as it takes aim at Nintendo's dominance in the gaming sector. With the "PlayStation Move," hopes to lure gamers who have outgrown Nintendo, which launched the in 2006 and became the first to introduce motion-detecting controllers.

Peter Dille, senior vice president of marketing for Sony Computer Entertainment, credited Nintendo Co. for "introducing motion gaming to the masses."

Now it's time for them to graduate to the PlayStation, which offers a new experience for both casual and hard-core gamers, he said at a press conference in San Francisco.

"The migration path from the Wii household to the PlayStation 3 household is a pretty natural path, partly because of the experience that you can get on the PlayStation Move but also because of the content that we find on PlayStation 3," Dille said.

Used with the existing PlayStation , Sony's new wireless can track players' body movements. The controller, in turn, has on its end a light-emitting orb that is recognized by the camera.

"Nothing has ever been this precise," said Shuhei Yoshida, president of Sony Computer Electronics Worldwide Studios.

The PlayStation Move will go on sale this fall. Complete details of prices have not been released, but a starter bundle including the PlayStation Eye, motion controller and one game will retail for under $100, Dille said.

Major such as Activision Blizzard Inc., Electronic Arts Inc. and Square Enix are developing Move-compatible games.

The latest announcement comes as both Sony and Microsoft Corp., maker of the Xbox 360, attempt to gain ground on Nintendo. Since the Wii first hit stores, it has consistently outsold rivals by attracting casual and nontraditional gamers like women and seniors.

Microsoft is planning its own offensive this year as well with its "Project Natal."

Natal, which combines a camera, depth sensor, microphone and processor, eliminates the need for any button-mashing device. Microsoft is expected to release Natal in time for the Christmas shopping season but has not set a specific date.

Although demand for the Wii has slowed in recent months, it remained the most popular console among Americans in January with 465,000 units sold, according to market researcher NPD Group. Microsoft sold 332,800 units of the Xbox 360, trailed by 276,900 units.

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Kedas
5 / 5 (1) Mar 11, 2010
The invention is a camera combined with a flash light??
Shaffer
not rated yet Mar 11, 2010
The invention is a camera combined with a flash light??


Not just a flashlight, but a flashlight with buttons!

I've got a Wii and a PS3....They both do completely different things, so why try to compete?
Justavian
not rated yet Mar 11, 2010
I've got a Wii and a PS3....They both do completely different things, so why try to compete?


You have to see it from the business perspective. Nintendo has sold more than twice as many Wiis as Sony has sold PS3s. And Nintendo was selling at a profit right out of the box - but Sony had to sell at a loss for quite some time, because of the expensive parts required. Sony wants to tap into that market and try to recoup its losses. If they convince everyone that they can do all of the casual stuff that the Wii will do, maybe they'll pull in more people who will only be buying ONE console...
El_Nose
not rated yet Mar 11, 2010
do not confuse the MS Natal which looks awesome from the demo's out there on the internet with the PS3 version of the wii controller. they are both mentioned in the article.
Bloodoflamb
not rated yet Mar 11, 2010
Natal is over-hyped.
dcap78
not rated yet Mar 11, 2010
This is just a camera tracking movement. this is nothing new. It still doesn't compare to the technology nintendo uses.
TrinityComplex
5 / 5 (1) Mar 11, 2010
Actually, Sony's technology is generally more capable than Nintendo's. The reason is that the 'sensor bar' on the Wii doesn't actually sense the infra-red signal, but emits it. The controller is what picks it up, then transmits it to the Wii. The controller has to encapsulate that motion sensing data, then send it out. Additionally there are frequent problems if you have shiny surfaces in the room with the beams being reflected all over the place and being captured incorrectly, causing inaccuracies. From what I understand Sony's technology uses light that is less prone that type of misread. Also the Move uses a wired sensor, giving it more bandwidth between the sensor and the machine, allowing for less lag when doing quick motions (as some may have noticed with games like the sword play in Wii Resort). I'm more curious about how the Move will sense the position of the control. The Wii MotionPlus seems to need to be recalibrated too often, but I admit that it's still tons of fun