Tumors may respond to extreme and moderate heat

Mar 11, 2010

Aided by ultrasound guidance, treating tumors with extreme heat or moderate heat may provide a possible therapeutic option, according to early research presented at the second AACR Dead Sea International Conference on Advances in Cancer Research: From the Laboratory to the Clinic, held March 7-10, 2010.

"Low temperature controlled hyperthermia and high temperature treatments are beneficial in curing both malignant and benign tumors using minimally invasive and noninvasive ultrasound techniques," said Osama M. Al-Bataineh, Ph.D., an assistant professor in biomedical engineering at the Hashemite University in Jordan.

Hyperthermia has previously been shown to increase to and prevent subsequent tissue repair. It has further been shown to enhance chemotherapy and immunotherapy treatments by changing the microcirculation and blood vessel permeability properties of a tumor.

Al-Bataineh and colleagues performed the following laboratory experiments.

Using (MRI) guidance, they were able to maintain desired temperature levels of 43 degrees Celsius for 30 minutes, which is considered the optimal dose to cause the required biological effect for hyperthermia treatment.

In a related experiment, high temperature (greater than 50 degrees Celsius) for between one to two minutes caused permanent tissue damage to the prostate tumor. High temperature treatment appeared to induce necrosis, or cell death.

Al-Bataineh said both extreme and moderate heat appear to have a clear effect on the tumor's , but further research would need to be done before any studies are conducted in humans.

Explore further: New study identifies potential targets for personalized cancer vaccines

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Potential for noninvasive brain tumor treatment

Jun 16, 2009

Duke University engineers have taken a first step toward a minimally invasive treatment of brain tumors by combining chemotherapy with heat administered from the end of a catheter.

Scientists pioneer new treatment for prostate cancer

Sep 15, 2008

Scientists at Sunnybrook Research Institute (SRI) are developing and commercializing a promising novel therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer that may offer patients a faster and more precise treatment than existing ...

MRI: A window to genetic properties of brain tumors

Mar 24, 2008

Doctors diagnose and prescribe treatment for brain tumors by studying, under a microscope, tumor tissue and cell samples obtained through invasive biopsy or surgery. Now, researchers at UCSD School of Medicine have shown ...

Ultrasound may better classify ovarian tumors

Nov 13, 2007

An elevated level of the protein CA-125 in blood is considered an indicator of whether an ovarian tumor is benign or malignant. This measure, however, can often be inaccurate. Another option is an ultrasound examination of ...

Recommended for you

Cancer exosome 'micro factories' aid in cancer progression

2 hours ago

Exosomes, tiny, virus-sized particles released by cancer cells, can bioengineer micro-RNA (miRNA) molecules resulting in tumor growth. They do so with the help of proteins, such as one named Dicer. New research from The University ...

User comments : 0