Pinpointing immune system disturbances in celiac disease

Feb 28, 2010

New research has identified four aspects of immune system disturbance which lead to the development of coeliac disease. Nearly 40 different inherited risk factors which predispose to the disease have now been identified. These latest findings could speed the way towards improved diagnostics and treatments for the autoimmune complaint that affects 1 in 100 of the population, and lead to insights into related conditions such as type 1 diabetes.

David van Heel, Professor of Gastrointestinal Genetics at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry has led an international team of researchers towards the discovery. Results of their research, funded by the Wellcome Trust, and supported by the patient charity Coeliac UK, are published online in on Sunday 28 Feb 2010.

Professor van Heel, commenting on the latest findings said: "We can now shed light on some of the precise immune disturbances leading to coeliac disease. These include how in the body react to toxic wheat proteins, how the thymus gland eliminates these T cells during infancy, and the body's response to . We now understand that many of these work by altering the amounts of these immune system genes that cells make. The data also suggests that coeliac disease is made up of hundreds of genetic risk factors, we can have a good guess at nearly half of the genetic risk at present."

The study also shows that there is substantial evidence to indicate a shared risk between the gene associated with coeliac disease and many other common chronic immune mediated diseases. Previously Professor van Heel had identified an overlap between coeliac disease and risk regions, as well as coeliac disease and .

Coeliac disease is common in the West, affecting around one per cent of the population. It is an auto-immune disease triggered by an intolerance to gluten (a protein found in foods containing wheat, barley and rye) that prevents normal absorption of nutrients. If undetected it can lead to severe health problems including anaemia, poor bone health, fatigue and weight loss.

Explore further: Mutations from Mars: Researchers explain why genetic fertility problems can persist in a population

More information: 'Multiple common variants for coeliac disease influencing immune gene expression' is published online in Nature Genetics on 28 Feb 2010.

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sysop
not rated yet Mar 01, 2010
A Medically and Dentally Mercury damaged immune system is the true cause of autoimmune disease, each victims DNA being the prism through which manifestation occurs in all its myriad forms, yet not the cause, mercury from dental and vaccine sources is the cause as it bypasses the intestine, which is the source of the immune system.

http://MercuryJustice.org
MoniDew
not rated yet Mar 01, 2010
I have NEVER had dental or medical mercury of any kind, and yet I have SEVERE celiac disease. So does my mother, and both her parents. The article is correct. This is a GENETIC disorder that causes an autoimmune condition. Please have some relationship with the facts before spouting your opinion.