Repeated inflations of a blood pressure cuff limits tissue damage in patients with AMI

Feb 26, 2010

Repeated lack of oxygen for short periods of time in a distant organ by stopping blood flow, can protect another organ (e.g. the heart), during a subsequent tissue damaging period due to oxygen deficiency. The principle can be applied before predictable oxygen deficiency during heart surgery. However, in most patients heart attacks are unpredictable. In this randomized single-blinded trial, the investigators tried to determine whether remote ischemic conditioning during evolving myocardial infarction could have a protective effect and decrease heart tissue damage in patients later undergoing acute balloon dilatation.

A total of 333 Danish patients were assigned to receive remote conditioning or no conditioning during ambulance transportation to the hospital for acute balloon dilatation. In the group receiving remote conditioning a blood pressure cuff was placed on the upper arm and inflated to 200 mmHg for 5 minutes to stop blood supply to the arm, and then released for another 5 minutes to restore . The procedure was repeated 4 times during transportation.

On average the amount of heart tissue saved was 30% higher in patients receiving remote conditioning compared to those receiving standard care. This increased to 50% among those with the highest amount of heart tissue threatened by coronary occlusion. Limitation of tissue damage resulted in improved heart function during hospitalization.

The underlying mechanisms are thought to be activation of protective systems in the heart. This induces resistance to tissue damage during lack of oxygen in particular when opening the occluded artery by balloon dilatation. The investigators characterize the treatment as inexpensive and promising, and predict that it will have widespread potential for the treatment of not only but also other diseases such as stroke. However, larger studies are needed to establish the precise benefits in patients. It also needs to be clarified whether the new treatment can reduce mortality and development of heart failure following a heart attack.

Explore further: New research demonstrates benefits of national and international device registries

Provided by Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Novel compound may lessen heart attack damage

Feb 07, 2008

A novel drug designed to lessen muscle damage from a heart attack has passed initial safety tests at the Duke Clinical Research Institute. Results of the study, available online and to be published in the February 19 issue ...

Severe heart attack damage limited by hydrogen sulfide

Sep 19, 2007

Administering hydrogen sulfide (H2S) directly into the heart during a simulated heart attack significantly reduces the tissue and cell damage often seen in oxygen-starved organs, according to a new study from researchers at the Uni ...

Advanced blood analysis may speed diagnosis of heart attacks

Sep 09, 2008

Someday doctors may be able to use a blood test to confirm within minutes, instead of hours, if a patient is having a heart attack, allowing more rapid treatment that could limit damage to heart muscle. A study led by investigators ...

Recommended for you

New approach to particle therapy dosimetry

Dec 19, 2014

Researchers at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), in collaboration with EMRP partners, are working towards a universal approach to particle beam therapy dosimetry.

Supplement maker admits lying about ingredients

Dec 17, 2014

Federal prosecutors say the owner and president of a dietary supplement company has admitted his role in the sale of diluted and adulterated dietary ingredients and supplements sold by his company.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.