Log exports down, lumber exports up in Washington and Oregon in 2009

Feb 25, 2010

A total of 697.3 million board feet of softwood logs was exported from Washington and Oregon in 2009, according to data released by the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station. During the same period, the two states exported a total of 344.2 million board feet of softwood lumber.

"This volume of softwood log exports was down 10.2 percent from the 2008 volume of 776.3 million board feet, while the volume of softwood lumber exports was up 17.5 percent from 293.0 million board feet," said Debra Warren, an economist with the station.

Warren compiled the data from the U.S. International Trade Commission and will publish it later this year, as she does annually, in Production, Prices, Employment, and Trade in Northwest Industries, a bulletin that provides current information on the region's lumber and plywood production and prices and employment in the forest industries.

Other highlights of the 2009 calendar year include:

Softwood Logs

  • Oregon and Washington imported 84.3 million board feet of softwood logs in 2009.
  • Some 368.4 million board feet (52.8 percent) of the 2009 log exports went to Japan, 247.9 million board feet (35.6 percent) went to South Korea, 2.3 million board feet went to Canada, 70.7 million board feet (10.1 percent) went to China, and 1.4 million board feet went to Taiwan.
  • Douglas-fir accounted for 64.1 percent of these log exports; western hemlock, 20.8 percent; and other softwoods made up the remaining 15.1 percent.
  • The total value of log shipments was $429.1 million at the port of exportation, and the average value was $615.42 per thousand board feet. Douglas-fir averaged $667.17 per thousand board feet; hemlock, $573.65; and other softwoods, $453.95. The average value of logs imported during 2009 was $367.53 per thousand board feet.
Softwood Lumber
  • Oregon and Washington imported 1.1 billion board feet of softwood lumber in 2009, mostly from Canada.
  • Some 111.6 million board feet (32.4 percent) of the 2009 softwood lumber exports went to Japan, 123.9 million board feet (36.0 percent) went to Canada, 29.2 million board feet (8.5 percent) went to the Philippines, 8.8 million board feet (2.6 percent) went to South Korea, 22.2 million board feet (6.4 percent) went to China, 10.5 million board feet (3.1 percent) went to Taiwan, 3.0 million board feet went to Australia, and 4.4 million board feet went to Vietnam.
  • Douglas-fir accounted for 51.2 percent of these lumber exports; western hemlock, 14.0 percent; and other softwoods made up the remaining 34.8 percent.
  • The total value of lumber shipments was $223.7 million at the ports of exportation, and the average value was $649.86 per thousand board feet. Douglas-fir averaged $762.11 per thousand board feet; western hemlock, $446.43; and other softwoods, $566.49. The average value of softwood lumber imported during 2009 was $414.49 per thousand board feet.

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