256 GB USB flash drive shipping in the US

Feb 22, 2010 by Lin Edwards weblog
Kingston DataTraveler 310

(PhysOrg.com) -- Kingston has released a new 256 GB USB flash drive for sale in the US. The drive is called the DataTraveler 310 and is basically the same as the model DataTraveler 300, also with a massive 256 GB capacity, which went on sale in Europe, the Middle East, Africa and the Asia/Pacific region in mid 2009.

The DataTraveler 310 is a standard flash drive but it can store data equivalent to up to 54 DVDs, 365 CDs or 51,000 pictures, according to Kingston’s USB business manager Andrew Ewing. He said feedback from customers and the company’s own research had found there was a need for an easy storage solution for large amounts of data, and the device would be useful for people such as engineers, architects, and designers, who need to transport and store huge data files.

The DataTraveler 310 is compatible with Windows (XP, Vista and 7), Linux (v2.6 or later), and Mac (v10.3 or higher). Data transfer rates for the new flash drive are 25 MB per second (read), and 12 MB per second (write). Up to about 90% of the flash drive’s capacity can be password protected without the need for administrator rights. The dimensions of the device are only 73.7 x 22.2 x 16.1 millimeters. It comes with a protective cap that can be fitted to the back of the .

The recommended retail price for the DataTraveler 310 is $1,108, and it is protected by a five-year warranty. It is the first of its capacity to be offered for sale in the US.

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User comments : 12

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Bob_Kob
2 / 5 (1) Feb 22, 2010
Im still using my 512 meg usb I bought back in 2005. I remember people watch in awe as I transferred files without using cds or floppys..
SteveL
4 / 5 (2) Feb 22, 2010
A 500x increase in 5 years. That's phenominal.

The minimum 6 hour write speed (to fill it up) hints at the need for a faster USB interface.
Branden520
5 / 5 (3) Feb 22, 2010
The patriot flash drives with the speed booster are able to get 38MB/s for read and 25MB/s write speed. Not much better but it is noticable.

USB 3.0 will blow these numbers out of the water.
El_Nose
5 / 5 (1) Feb 22, 2010
$1100 + tax for 250 GB

-- Booo buy a $80 320GB passport external hardrive that fits in your pocket and is the size of your wallet.
zbarlici
2.8 / 5 (4) Feb 22, 2010
El nose - perhaps you should grow an El Braino and stop comparing apples to oranges, disk drives to solid state memory :P

but really it is very expensive, unreasonably so. They won`t sell too many of those till the price comes down by, say, 80% ?
DKoncewicz
2.8 / 5 (4) Feb 22, 2010
@zbarlici

I don't see a problem in comparing usb drives and 2.5" external hard drives from a practicality standpoint today. They're both quite portable, just that you might not wear an EHD as a keychain or necklace type thing. I guess you could make an argument for carrying multiple drives but with the amount of time it would take to fully fill up that 256 gig usb (six hours at the 12mb/s write speed) you might as well buy a 2 terrabyte external drive with a usb 3.0 connection in a few months.

Until the price comes down to under 300, and the technology switches to USB 3.0 it's not a very practical product. I commend kingston for pushing the amount of storage these things have, but they really need usb 3.0 technology to make large data transfers practical.
Thex1138
not rated yet Feb 22, 2010
Mine works a treat! Ibought with the recent price drop of 30% http://www.techbu...56GB.asp
[Edit]
Objectivist
not rated yet Feb 24, 2010
@zbarlici

I don't see a problem in comparing usb drives and 2.5" external hard drives from a practicality standpoint today. They're both quite portable, just that you might not wear an EHD as a keychain or necklace type thing. I guess you could make an argument for carrying multiple drives but with the amount of time it would take to fully fill up that 256 gig usb (six hours at the 12mb/s write speed) you might as well buy a 2 terrabyte external drive with a usb 3.0 connection in a few months.

By all means, completely ignore the near instant random access speed, which is by far the most important difference, and focus on what can be worn around your neck.
addidis
not rated yet Feb 24, 2010
Totally absolutely with out a doubt too expensive. This thing cost more then my car. Granted it doesn't say much for my car, but really? This reminds me of buying my first case of 3.5 inch floppies , thinking of my new found massive storage, that cost me 150.
DKoncewicz
not rated yet Feb 26, 2010
@zbarlici

I don't see a problem in comparing usb drives and 2.5" external hard drives from a practicality standpoint today. They're both quite portable, just that you might not wear an EHD as a keychain or necklace type thing. I guess you could make an argument for carrying multiple drives but with the amount of time it would take to fully fill up that 256 gig usb (six hours at the 12mb/s write speed) you might as well buy a 2 terrabyte external drive with a usb 3.0 connection in a few months.

By all means, completely ignore the near instant random access speed, which is by far the most important difference, and focus on what can be worn around your neck.


Yes, I'm sorry, I was completely ignoring all of that. In fact, my response was only one line long, it said "you can wear it as a key chain". Thank you for having the vision to pick out a peripheral comment and treating it as the entire point of the post.
bfast
not rated yet Feb 27, 2010
"near instant random access speed, which is by far the most important difference"

Balderdash. The differece between solid state memory and hard drives are their ability to withstand shock! I bought a 1/2t drive just over a year ago. I burned a bunch of old videos onto is, and dumped my video player. Then my daughter dropped it. Back to videos for me.

This is why I want solid state memory. But I certainly don't want it $1000 worth.
antialias
not rated yet Feb 28, 2010
This is something that will appeal to businesses first (until the price comes down).

Think of all the people shuttling back and forth who have to carry large data storage with them (e.g. IT professionals who need to acrry a full suit of setup/recovery tools for all situations).

1000$ isn't a lot to businesses - especially if it means that the data is better protected than with disk drives (one failure of data storage on a trip can cost you 10 times the cost of the stick easily)

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